2020-2021 College Catalog 
    
    Dec 01, 2022  
2020-2021 College Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Addendum


 

2021 -2022 Medgar Evers College of The City University of New York

Catalog Addendum

 

June 2021

ACADEMIC MATTERS

Special Action(s)

 

PART A: ACADEMIC MATTERS

 

Section AII: Special Actions

NONE

 

Section II: Changes in Generic Degree Requirements

NONE

 

Section III: Changes in Degree Programs

 

AIII.1 New Minor in Cannabis Studies offered by the Department of Chemistry and Environmental Science

 

 

FROM

TO:

NAME OF PROGRAM

No such minor is currently offered

MINOR in Cannabis Studies

PROGRAM TYPE

N/A

□ Associate  □ Bachelor     □ Concentration  ⌧ Minor

COURSES:

N/A

  1. CHM 207: Introduction to the World of Cannabis (introductory survey course)
  2. CHM 307: Cannabis Formulation: Pre reqs: CHM201
  3. CHM 407 Cannabis Testing: Pre reqs: CHM303 and Cannabis formulations above
  4. ENVS 308 Best Practices in Cannabis Environmental Science: Pre reqs: ENVS200
  5. CHM 408 Cannabis Chemistry and Pharmacology Pre reqs: CHM303 and BIO201 (or BIO251)
  6. CHM 208 Cannabis Social Impacts
  7. CHM 308 Cannabis Medicine and Health Professions Pre reqs: BIO201 or BIO251
  8. CHM 209 Commercializing Cannabis Science
  9. CHM 309 NY Dispensary 101
  10. CHM 310 Dispensary Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs)
  11. CHM 409 Cannabis Internship

TOTAL CREDITS:

N/A

12

STUDENTS SERVED:

N/A

35-60 students enrolled at initial launch of degree minor

 

TRACKS: Curriculum - From cannabis courses approved thus far. 3 degree minor tracks: 12 credits each

 

  • Science 1-Formulation/Testing: Cannabis Formulation CHM307; Cannabis Testing CHM407; and 2 other cannabis courses (one Cannabis CHM2XX AND any other cannabis course)
  • Science Commercialization: Commercializing Cannabis Science CHM209; NY Dispensary 101 CHM309; Dispensary Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) CHM310; and 1 other cannabis course
  • Social and Health Impacts: Cannabis Social Impacts CHM208; Cannabis Medicine and Health Professions CHM308; Cannabis Chemistry and Pharmacology CHM408; and 1 other cannabis course.

RATIONALE:

 

In 2021, the unfolding cannabis industry presents a rare and unique phenomenon whereby an explosive emerging industry is not only championed by a state government, but also backed by that state’s fiscal budget. Further, very rare is the case that the industry is mandated to set aside budget allocation for a population segment that is the same segment that few campuses, like MEC, cater to. As a professor at MEC for the past 12 years, in spite of social justice being a major facet of the founder’s charge for the institution, I cannot recall many major social justice movements spear- headed by MEC on behalf of the community it serves. Yet the students, the community and the campus have been plagued with a plethora of so- cial injustices. In 2021, the cannabis industry presents a unique opportunity to increase the good the campus is already doing. MEC students, fac- ulty and staff can be proud of the university if it acts now as it must. Given MEC’s role and founding charge in safeguarding the economically disen- franchised community it serves as well as those adversely impacted by the cannabis industry’s history, MEC must and should provide campus and educational leadership in this area. This degree minor is part of a broader program that will contribute to MEC executing its charge in terms of edu- cation, economic uplift, and social justice. Approving this minor program is a major step in MEC signaling to those stakeholders its intention to champion real social equity and social justice change.

 

This minor degree program accomplishes the following:

 

  1. Strengthens existing curriculum by offering a market and industry driven program with built in pipelines for employment: As of Jan 2021, there were 321,000 full-time equivalent (FTE) jobs reported to be supported by legal cannabis in the US. During the COVID19 pandemic, one of the worst periods for economic growth since World War II, that number of FTE jobs represented an astounding 32% year- over-year job growth over the previous year. As the cannabis industry continues its explosive growth, this degree minor, which was co- created with cannabis industryleaders, is necessary to address the need for specialty skilled and educated workers. In addition to class- room education, this minor program contains built in pipelines for industry related internships, mentorships, experiential learn- ing, and job placement opportunities.

 

  1. Positions MEC to proactively catch the wave (thereby securing first mover/player advantage): One of MEC’s expressed mission goals is to “prepare students for leadership roles in a changing world so that they and the College can be energizers or change agents in the community.” The emerging cannabis industry presents this changing world. This minor degree program is a necessary step towards education and workforce development for our stakeholders in this changing world. As possibly the first such degree program in NYC, this new and unique program would give MEC a competitive edge in attracting many students in NYC and its surrounding areas.

 

  1. Provides a necessary and critical step to secure industry funding: 1. Cannabis companies will provide us funding only if we have al- ready demonstrated the right levels of readiness. 2. Cannabis companies will not give funding if we cannot deliver for them the persuasion that they need to secure licenses. 3. We cannot help these companies secure their goals unless we create an infrastructure that provides
 

 

the companies an outlet to deliver acceptable levels of favorable social equity community impact. 4. We cannot build an infrastructure un- less we have a pipeline of workforce trainees 5. We cannot have a pipeline of workforce trainees without a dedicated program of study that equips students with the necessary skill sets. Having a minor degree program as part of a larger social equity program is critically neces- sary in order to sustain an infrastructure that delivers the type of workforce training that secures cannabis industry funding.

 

  1. Provides a necessary and critical step to secure state funding: Having a cannabis minor is a necessary step to gain portions of the 40 percent of cannabis tax revenues and reinvestment monies set aside by the state for addressing cannabis social and economic disparities.

 

  1. Provides a necessary step towards addressing student and community demand: Many colleges face existential threat in 2021 owing to declining enrollment, retention, attrition, and budget shortfalls and shrinking budgets. This degree program is necessary to address such threats by providing education and training in an area that our stakeholders are demanding.122 people in the MEC campus community weighed in on their desire for cannabis education courses on MEC’s campus. 98 percent of respondents indicated a definite or possible interest in taking cannabis courses at MEC. 93.2 percent indicated an interest in enrolling in a cannabis minor on our campus. 77.7 percent of respondents indicated an interest in enrolling in a cannabis major on our campus. Interestingly, a large portion of respondents who were either no longer or not currently enrolled at MEC indicated that they would enroll or reenroll there if the campus offered cannabis education courses.

 

  1. f. Provides timely academic rigor in a degree offering: Cannabis courses in this program’s health and science tracks are grounded in basic science and require select prerequisites as General Chemistry, Organic Chemistry; General Biology; Anatomy and Physiology. Can- nabis business courses are also grounded in business and entrepreneurship principles that are not only applicable to cannabis but also to other industries.

 

  1. Provides a pathway to attain crucial additional sponsored academic scholarship in an emerging industry: There is a substantial body of scholarly cannabis research in areas such as medicine, chemistry, and business. Nonetheless far more research is needed to fully assess cannabis as a therapeutic potential versus health risk, chemical composition and related bioactivities, environmental impact and mitigation, societal impact, and many other areas important to society. This minor program is an essential component of a larger program that will facilitate interdisciplinary funded faculty, student and industry collaborative research projects and publications.

 

 

Effective: Fall 2021

 

FROM

 

TO

NAME OF PROGRAM

Minor in Urban Education

Minor in Urban Education for STEM Majors

PROGRAM TYPE

  • Associate  ⌧ Bachelor
  • Concentration □ Minor
  • Associate  ⌧ Bachelor
  • Concentration □ Minor

COURSES:

EDUC 102-Introduction to the Learner

EDUC 355-Critical Issues in the History of Education EDUC 103-School Community Relations

EDUC 200– History and Foundations of Bilingual General and Bilingual Special Education

PA 301-Education Policy

EDUC 102-Introduction to the Learner with Co-Requisite Early Field Experience (EDUC 501)

EDUC 355-Critical Issues in the History of Education OR

PA 301: Education Policy

EDUC 312-Teaching Elementary Reading with Co-Requisite Supervised Field Experience (EDUC 506 Part I)

EDUC 315-Teaching Elementary Math with Co-Requisite Supervised Field Experience (EDUC 505)

EDUC 317-Teaching Elementary Science with Co-Requisite Supervised Field Experience (EDUC 506 Part II)

TOTAL CREDITS:

12

13-14

STUDENTS SERVED:

All Students

 

 

RATIONALE: The proposed change is an additional track that will modify the required courses for the currently approved minor in Urban Educa- tion to better reflect the pedagogical needs of pre-service STEM teachers. This partnership with the School of Science, Health and Technology and School of Education will provide a new option for Science majors to complete a minor in Urban Education.

 

All courses are already approved in the School of Education’s Curriculum. The additional courses will make the credits for the minor now total 13 credits. Participants in the TIPS program, created to train Biology majors to become STEM teachers will have the added benefit of their tuition beyond financial aid being covered by the program.

 

 

AIV.1

 

Department(s)

Nursing

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

NUR

Course Number

310

Course Title

Nursing Informatics

Short Description

Nursing Informatics

Catalogue Description

This course focuses on concepts relevant to the practice of nursing informatics. This course builds upon computer technology competencies of registered nurses learned and acquired. The course is intended to provide practical information about computer applications and information systems in healthcare. The registered nursing student is exposed to electronic health records and the analysis of health care data and its transformation to nursing knowledge. The course also examines social and ethical issues in the context of practice in the health care deliv- ery system. The registered nursing student will examine the impact of evolving/emerging information technologies on the role of health care providers and consumers.

Prerequisites

CIS 280

Co-requisites

NUR 304, and NUR/NURL 316

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

General Education Component

X       Not Applicable

 

Rationale. Nursing Informatics will bring the curriculum up to date with core competencies for the BS prepared nurse. This revision is based on faculty assessment of the current curriculum for integrity, rigor, and currency, plus standards, guidelines, and competencies.

 

 

Department(s)

Nursing

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

NUR

Course Number

423

Course Title

Health Policy for Nurses

Short Description

Health Policy and Nursing

Catalogue Description

This course introduces the student to the history, organization, delivery and financing of the U. S. Healthcare System. Students will learn about U.S. health care policy, including analysis of the political, cultural and economic forces that influence the development of health policy and healthcare. Discussions will include health care costs and financing, public health, health care reform, health care quality, Medicare, Medicaid, long-term care. The course will highlight current problems and opportunities for patients, caregivers, purchasers (government and business) and insurers of health care as they seek to operate within the current U.S. health system.

Prerequisites

NUR 304, NUR 310, NUR/L 316, NUR/L 318, NUR 321, MTH 209

Co-requisites

NUR/L 421, and NUR 425

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Science

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

 X Not Applicable

 

Rationale. Health Policy for nurses will bring the curriculum up to date with core competencies for the BS prepared nurse. This revision is based on faculty assessment of the current curriculum for integrity, rigor, and currency, plus standards, guidelines, and competencies.

 

 

Department(s)

Chemistry and Environmental Science

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENVS

Course Number

308

Course Title

Best Practices in Cannabis Environmental Science

Short Description

Best Practices in Cannabis Environmental Science

Catalogue Description

This course addresses major environmental issues in the cannabis industry involving cultivation, manufacturing, and processing. In response to recent policy changes that have led to an explosion in the cannabis industry, this course teaches student of innovative technologies that lower cannabis production costs while also minimizing en- vironmental impacts. Best practices guidelines for conserving natural resources and reducing adverse environ- mental impact through sustainable technologies are presented.

Prerequisites

CHM 207 (Introduction to the World of Cannabis) or ENVS 200 (Environmental Health Issues)

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Science

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Socio-Cultural, and Diversity Cluster

 

Rationale. As students traverse the cannabis industry as practitioners, they must gain awareness and knowledge of how their actions and those of the organizations they work in impact major environmental outcomes. Skill sets acquired in this course will equip these students to become environmental stewards, and to further their environmental studies.

 

 

Department(s)

Chemistry and Environmental Science

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

CHM

Course Number

408

Course Title

Cannabis Chemical Pharmacology

Short Description

Cannabis Chemical Pharmacology

Catalogue Description

This course exposes students to cannabis chemistry and its pharmacological implications. Students are introduced to chemical compositions contained in cannabis and how they can pharmacologically combat patient ailments. This course also introduces students to effective drug delivery systems and protocols that currently deploy such compositions in effective medicinal treatment. Case studies and published medical literature are used to engage students in timely and recent developments.

Prerequisites

CHM (Organic Chemistry) and either BIO 201 (General Biology I) or BIO 251 (Human Anatomy and Physiology I)

Co-requisites

N/A

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Science

[ X ] Yes

Frequency:

Once per academic year

Anticipated Enrollment

Fall Semester

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

 

 

Rationale: Cannabis as medicine is rapidly gaining legal status throughout the United States including in New York. Students will soon become practitioners such as pharmacists, drug, development scientists and researchers who will touch the plant and/or work on its pharmaceutical production processes will need an understanding of how cannabis interacts with the human body. This course delivers that critically needed pharmacological knowledge to students so they can successfully contribute in this field.

13

 

 

Department(s)

Chemistry and Environmental Science

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

CHM

Course Number

409

Course Title

Cannabis internship

Short Description

Cannabis Internship

Catalogue Description

This internship course provides students an opportunity to gain critical insights as a worker in the cannabis indus- try. Students identify and gain internship acceptance at a cannabis organization of their choosing. The worksite must provide an opportunity for each student to perform work that is related to his/her declared emphasis/concen- tration in the cannabis studies degree program. Proof of the organization’s cannabis standing must be provided by each student and preapproved by the course professor. Student’s document and report their progress an how their work is transpiring. This 12-week internship flexibly accommodates internships that cannot start and/or stop within an academic semester calendar

Prerequisites

Any 300 level Cannabis Course

Co-requisites

 

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Science

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

 

 

Rationale: Students need this course in order to gain the types of field experience that employers expect them to acquire prior to being hired. This course also provides students insights on actually working in a cannabis firm that might guide the types of post-graduate emploument or education the students pursue.

 

 

Department(s)

Chemistry and Environmental Science      

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

CHM

Course Number

308

Course Title

Cannabis Medicine & Health Professions

Short Description

Cannabis Medicine & Health Professions

Catalogue Description

This course is designed to familiarize students on both the research and clinical practice aspects of therapeutic us- ages of cannabis. Students will explore the endocannabinoid system, the interactions of cannabinoids in this system and the use of cannabis as a therapeutic in a number of health conditions. Students will be guided to study effects of various methods of delivery for cannabis therapies, as well as study parameters in dosage guidelines and recom- mendations. Students wishing to work in registered dispensing facilities or as cannabis medicinal caregivers will benefit greatly from taking this course given its treatment of training and certification opportunities in the medicinal cannabis field.

Prerequisites

BIO 201 (General Biology I) or BIO 251 (Human Anatomy and Physiology I)

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Science

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

 

 

Rationale: Students need this course in order to understand the broad and complex backdrop of the field of medicinal cannabis. As medicinal cannabis usage continues to gain momentum towards an established therapeutic. In its own right, students as future practitioners will confront many different voices on how best to proceed until a dominant design protocol emerges. Taking this course is necessary for students to gain critical insights on the latest science available that sheds lights on bes practices in the field of cannabis therapeutic treatments and optimal patient care.

 

 

Department(s)

Chemistry and Environmental Science

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

CHM

Course Number

307

Course Title

Cannabis Product Formulation

Short Description

Cannabis Product Formulation

Catalogue Description

This course introduces students to cannabis product formulation for medical and functional use. Students will be introduced to a variety of cannabis product variations called formulations and how to make such formulations stable and consistent using various types of current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) and quality control procedures. As chemical components of cannabis vary drastically, it becomes crucial to obtain accurate information to analyze the chemical composition necessary to produce sale and effective formulations. Student will also learn a variety of analytical methods and instrumentation that are used in probing the composition of cannabis raw materials and final products.

Prerequisites

CHM 201 (General Chemistry)

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

 

 

Rationale. Many students at Medgar Evers College desire to either create their own Hemp, CBD and other cannabis products Other students desire to work at firms that produce cannabis related products. As students develop new cannabis products, they will need to know how to address issues of product composition, bioavailability and stability. This course provides students with these three critical cannabis product development competencies.

 

 

Department(s)

Chemistry and Environmental Science

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

CHM

Course Number

407

Course Title

Cannabis Product Testing

Short Description

Cannabis Product Testing

Catalogue Description

The course builds on CHM 3XX Cannabis Product Formulation. Students are provided a more in-depth treatment of various techniques and instrumentation used in cannabis product testing. One of the biggest challenges for the US cannabis industry is a lack of national standards for specifications and cannabis product testing. Nonetheless, product composition, reproducibility and specification guarantee are essential to numerous stakeholders in the cannabis in- dustry. This course guides students to learn various techniques used to investigate cannabis products compositions. Students will also be guided on the use of various analytical instruments for product testing in the cannabis industry. Experiential learning opportunities are provided in collaboration with licensed producers and testing labs.

Prerequisites

CHM 307 (Cannabis Product Formulation) and CHM 303 (Organic Chemistry I)

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Science

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

 

 

Rationale: Students who desire to create their own cannabis products or work at firms that produce cannabis related products will need to know procedures for testing their product composition. This course provides students with the expertise to effectively analyze cannabinoid, pesticide, heavy metal, terpene and mycotoxin content. Students will need this training to effectively investigate cannabis products safety investigate cannabis product safety and therapeutic efficacy.

 

 

Department(s)

Chemistry and Environmental Science (and BUS ADMIN)

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENVS

Course Number

209

Course Title

Commercializing Cannabis Science

Short Description

Commercializing Cannabis Science

Catalogue Description

This course focuses on understanding current developments in cannabis science, technology, medicine and commerce and how those developments create new career and commercialization opportunities. Stu- dents will explore actions that successful organizations, pharmaceutical companies, not for profit firms, non-governmental organizations and other institutions and people take to develop innovative solutions in this industry. Emphasis will be placed on guiding students to examine the overlay of science, technology

and commerce challenges and opportunities existing in both highly urban and rural communities. Emphasis will be placed on analyzing existing strengths, weakness, opportunities, and threats towards identifying unique opportunities for innovations. Students will also explore ways they can address some of these unique opportunities by establishing a conceptual idea of their own commercialization, or not for profit pur- suit while positioning themselves to meet corresponding challenges as attractive employees to firms in this industry.

Prerequisites

ENGL 150 - English Composition II

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Science

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

 

 

Rationale: This course is necessary to prepare students to commercialize any cannabis related science innovations they create. Student taking this course should be made aware of different options to commercialize any innovations and technology they create. Without such knowledge, students might unintentionally share trade secrets, patentable information, and other forms of intellectual property to potential competitors, to the detriment of the students. Armed with the skills taught in this course, students can protect and proactively strategize commercialization and wealth retention on the front end of their technology and science-based creations.

 

 

Department(s)

Chemistry and Environmental Science

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

CHM

Course Number

310

Course Title

Dispensary Standard Operating Procedures

Short Description

Dispensary Standard Operating Procedures

Catalogue Description

This course focuses on different standard operating procedures (SOPs) formalized in cannabis dispensaries. Suc- cessful cannabis dispensaries require consistency in compliance, quality control, business processes, and financial management. Students in this course will be guided through the steps of systemizing and standardizing processes in these functional areas. Students will explore how SOPs facilitate enhancements in firm performance.

Prerequisites

CHM 207 (Introduction to the world of Cannabis) or CHM 209 (Commercialization of Cannabis)

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Science

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

 

 

Rationale: Retailers, customers, and consumers demand very high standards and specifications when purchasing cannabis industry product. Stu- dents learn those standards and specifications in this class, as well as the operating procedures necessary to deliver such specifications. Thus, this course is necessary for students to learn how to ensure that production operations are performed consistently, and how to maintain quality control processes and products.

 

 

Department(s)

Chemistry and Environmental Science

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

CHM

Course Number

207

Course Title

Introduction to the World of Cannabis

Short Description

Introduction to the World of Cannabis

Catalogue Description

This course will introduce students to the magnificent yet controversial world of cannabis. This course presents a 360-degree view of the cannabis industry including aspects of the plant’s history, horticulture, chemistry and pro- cessing. The cannabis industry is projected to generate billions of dollars in revenues over the next few years, as well as employment opportunities for more than half a million people. Cannabis science pharmacology, commercial- ization, banking laws, and a host of other topics of high interest will be explored. The course will also provide in- sights into social public, and mental health impact of cannabis.

Prerequisites

ENGL150 - English Composition II

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Science

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

 

 

Rationale: Students need this foundational course to aid their decisions on which advanced cannabis courses they might pursue. This course con- nects students possessing only limited lay knowledge on the fledgling academic field of cannabis to the most recent science and industry’s best practices. The course exposes students to a broad array of potential paths they might pursue in cannabis studies and careers.

 

 

Department(s)

Chemistry and Environmental Science

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

CHM

Course Number

309

Course Title

New York Cannabis Dispensary 101

Short Description

New York Cannabis Dispensary 101

Catalogue Description

This course walks students through the required processes of becoming a registered business organization and applying for a New York State medical cannabis dispensary license. This course teaches student nuanced intrica- cies that are necessary to overcome when an organization decide to complete an application to become a regis- tered organization and acquire a cannabis dispensary license. Students will experientially engage in a mock canna- bis dispensary license application submission.

Prerequisites

CHM 207 (Introduction to the World of Cannabis) or CHM 209 (Commercialization of Cannabis)

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Science

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

 

 

Rationale: This course is necessary for students to learn the steps that medical cannabis facilities undergo to gain a successful registration and cannabis dispensary license. In order to gain this knowledge, students must be guided through an elaborate and complex semester long project encompassing the steps of submitting a cannabis dispensary license application for a mock dispensary.

 

2021 -2022 Medgar Evers College of The City University of New York

Catalog Addenda

 

March 2021

ACADEMIC MATTER

 

CHANGES TO GENERAL EDUCATION

AII.1

PA 150 Introduction to Criminal Law has been approved for the Individual and Society bucket of the Pathways Flexible Core

 

 

PART A: ACADEMIC MATTERS

 

 

Section AII: Special Actions NONE

 

Section II: Changes in Generic Degree Requirements NONE

 

Section III: Changes in Degree Programs

 

AIII.1 The following revisions are proposed for the BS in Public Administration Program: BS in Public Administration

Program Codes: 2102 (HEGIS)

Effective: Fall 2020

 

Description: The addition of PA 300 to the Department Core; the Removal of PA 395 from Department Core and the addition of PA 395 to all PA Degree Concentrations - Criminal Justice, Law and Public Policy, International Administration, Comparative Administration, Community Development, and General Concentration

 

From

From

Course                                                                               Credits

Course                                                                               Credits

BS- PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION: MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

ACCT 217       Principles of Accounting                        3

CIS 101           Computer Fundamentals                        3

CIS 211           Internet and Emerging Technology                        3

ECON 212       Macroeconomics                        3

FS 101            Freshman Seminar 101                        3

LAW 208         The Legal Environment of Business                        3

LIB 100          Library and Research Methods                       2

MTH 213         Introduction to Statistics                        3

PA 103            Introduction to Public Service and Administration 3 PA 150                        Introduction to Criminal Law                        3

Or

PA 260            Constitutional Law                        3

Department of Public Administration

Proposed Department Core- BS Degree

CIS 101        Computer Fundamentals                    3

CIS 211         Internet and Emerging Technology    3

FS 101          Freshman Seminar I                           1

FS 102          Freshman Seminar II                           1

LIB 100         Library and Research Methods          2

MTH 213      Introduction to Statistics                      3

PA 103         Introduction to Public Service and Administration                                                           3

PA 150          Introduction to Criminal Law               3

Or

PA 260          Constitutional Law                              3

PA 200          Introduction to Nonprofit Administration                                                           3

 

PA 200            Introduction to Nonprofit Administration 3

Or

PA 215            Designing Local Programs                        3

PA 205            Public Personnel                        3

PA 211            NYS and Local Government                        3

PA 225            Introduction to Public Policy                        3

PA 285            International Administration                        3

PA 290            Internship I                        3

PA 325            Fiscal Administration                        3

PA 326            Ethics in Government                        3

PA 390            Research Methods and Statistics          3

PA 395            Public Administration and Disaster Management 3 PA 407                        Comparative Public Administration 3

OR

PA 486            Global Public Policy                        3

PA 490            Internship (Capstone Course)                        3

PAXXX            Elective                        3

 

 

Concentration -12 Credits:

Choose One from the List Below

Law Pathways/Criminal Justice Administration:

required for students pursuing careers in law enforcement PA 150- Introduction to Criminal Law

PA 235- Criminal Justice and Its Processes PA 250 - Parole and Probation

PA 275 -Community Policing

PA 365 -Crime and Punishment in Urban America PA 440 -Judicial Processes and Court Systems

 

 

 

 

International Administration

PA 395 - Public Administration and Disaster Management PA 407 - Comparative Administration

PA 450 -Decision Making

PA 480 -Globalization and Public Administration

PA 485 -Seminar: International Administration and Diplomacy PA 486 -Global Public Policy

Or

PA 215          Designing Local Programs                             3

PA 205          Public Personnel                                            3

PA 211          NYS and Local Government                          3

PA 214          Organization Theory

PA 225          Public Policy and Caseload Management     3

PA 285          Administration of Global Institutions              3

PA 290          Internship I                                                      3

PA 300*        Public Bureaucracy and Disaster Management 3

PA 325          Fiscal Administration                                      3

PA 326          Ethics in Government                                     3

PA 390          Research Methods and Statistics                  3

PA 407          Comparative Public Administration                3

OR

PA 486          Global Public Policy                                       3

PA 413          Program Evaluation                                        3

PA 450          Decision-making in Government (Capstone) 3

PA 490          Internship II                                                     3

Electives                                                                             12

Grand Total                                                                        78

 

Concentration- 12 Credits:

Choose One Concentration from the List Below Law Pathways/Criminal Justice Administration:

required for students pursuing careers in Law Enforcement PA 235 -Criminal Justice and Its Processes

PA 250 -Parole and Probation PA 275 - Community Policing PA 311-GIS Applications

PA 365 -Crime and Punishment in Urban America (If Not Taken as Part of the College Option)

PA 395* - Cases Studies in Emergency and Disaster Management PA 415 - Policymaking and the Public Interest

PA 440 -Judicial Processes and Court Systems

 

 

International Administration

ACCT 217 -Principles of Accounting

LAW 208 -Legal Environment of Business

PA 395* - Cases Studies in Emergency and Disaster Management PA 407 -Comparative Administration (lf Not Taken in Department

 

 

 

Non-Profit Administration

PA 330- Public Policy, Advocacy, and Services for the Aged

PA 335 -Principles of Philanthropy, Fundraising, and Development PA 340 -Strategic Planning, Budgeting, and Project Management PA 395 -Public Administration and Disaster Management

PA 450 -Decision Making

PA 410 -Administrative Rules and Regulations PA 413 -Public Program Evaluation

Public Policy

PA 3XX- Blacks in Government PA 30I - Education Policy

PA 315 -Case Studies in Public Policy

PA 330 - Public Policy, Advocacy, and Services for the Aged PA 405 -NYC Administration

PA 410 -Administrative Rules and Regulations PA 413 - Public Program Evaluation

PA 415 - Policymaking and the Public Interest ECON 430/PA 430 -War on Drugs

PA 450 -Decision Making PA 486 -Global Public Policy

 

Community Development/Urban Administration PA 3XX- Blacks in Government

PA 325 -Fiscal Administration

PA 340 - Strategic Planning, Budgeting, and Project Manage- ment PA 350 -Theories of Urban Administration

PA 365 -Crime and Punishment in Urban America

PA 395 -Public Administration and Disaster Management

PA 405 -NYC Administration PA 410 -Administrative Rules and Regulations

PA 413 -Public Program Evaluation PA 450 -Decision Making

Core) PA 415 -Policymaking and the Public Interest ECON 430/PA 430 -War on Drugs

PA 480 -Globalization and Public Administration

PA 485 - Seminar: International Administration and Diplomacy PA-486 - Global Public Policy (If not taken in Department Core)

 

Non-Profit Administration

ACCT 217 -Principals of Accounting

LAW 208 -Legal Environment of Business PA 301 - Education Policy

PA 330 - Public Policy, Advocacy, and Services for the Aged

PA 335 -Principles of Philanthropy, Fundraising, and Development PA 340 -Strategic Planning, Budgeting, and Project Management PA 395* - Case Studies in Emergency and Disaster Management PA 410 -Administrative Rules and Regulations

PA 415 -Policymaking and the Public Interest

 

Law and Public Policy

ACCT 217 -Principals of Accounting

LAW 208 - Legal Environment of Business PA 3XX- Blacks in Government

PA 301 -Education Policy PA 311 -GIS Applications

PA 315 -Case Studies in Public Policy

PA 330 -Public Policy, Advocacy, and Services for the Aged

PA 395* - Cases Studies in Emergency and Disaster Management PA 405 -NYC Administration

PA 410 -Administrative Rules and Regulations PA 415 -Policymaking and the Public Interest ECON 430/PA 430 -War on Drugs

PA 486 -Global Public Policy (If Not taken in Department Core)

 

 

Community Development

ACCT 217 - Principals of Accounting LAW 208 -Legal Environment of Business PA 3XX- Blacks in Government

PA 311 -GIS Applications

PA 340 - Strategic Planning, Budgeting, and Project Management PA 350- Theories of Urban Administration

PA 365 -Crime and Punishment in Urban America (If Not Taken as

 

 

Part of the College Option)

PA 395* - Cases Studies in Emergency and Disaster Management PA 405 -NYC Administration

PA 410 -Administrative Rules and Regulations PA 415 -Policymaking and the Public Interest

 

 

General Concentration

ACCT 208 -Principals of Accounting

LAW 208 -Legal Environment of Business PA 235- Criminal Justice and Its Processes PA 250 -Parole and Probation

PA 275 -Community Policing PA 3XX- Blacks in Government PA 311 -GIS Applications

PA 315 -Case Studies in Public Policy

PA 330 -Public Policy, Advocacy, and Services for the Aged

PA 335 -Principles of Philanthropy, Fundraising, and Development PA 340 -Strategic Planning, Budgeting, and Project Management PA 350 -Theories of Urban Administration

PA 365 -Crime and Punishment in Urban America (If Not Taken as Part of the College Option)

PA 395* - Cases Studies in Emergency and Disaster Management PA 405 -NYC Administration

PA 407 -Comparative Administration (If Not Taken in Department Core} PA 410 - Administrative Rules and Regulations

PA 415 - Policymaking and the Public Interest

ECON 430/PA 430 -War on Drugs (If Not Taken as Part of the College Option)

PA 440 -Judicial Processes and Court Systems PA 480 -Globalization and Public Administration

PA 485 -Seminar: International Administration and Diplomacy PA 486 - Global Public Policy (If Not taken in Department Core)

 

 

General Education Requirements

 

ENGL 112

Composition I

3

ENOL 150

College Composition II

3

BIO 101

Introduction to the Science of Biology

3

PHS 101

Introduction to Physical Science

3

 

MTH 136

Algebra and Trigonometry

 

 

3

ENGL 212

World Literature: The Evolving Canon

 

 

3

ART 100

Or

MUS 100

Introduction to World Art

 

Introduction to World Music

 

 

3

 

3

HlST 200

Growth and Development of the US

 

3

 

ECON 212

Principles of Macroeconomics

 

3

 

SSC 101

Or

SOC 101

Culture, Society, and Change

 

Introduction to Sociology

 

3

 

3

 

BIO 211

Biotechnology and Society

 

3

 

Total

 

 

30

 

 

College Option (12 Credits)

Foreign Language I/Foreign Language II

 

 

 

6

One Socio-Cultural

3

 

One Integrative Knowledge

3

 

 

Total Grand Total

12

42

 

 

Rationale: PA 300 was originally a part of the Department Core but was removed and subsequently became a hidden pre-requisite for all upper level PA courses. It is now being re-designed and renamed and can once again serve as the pre-requisite to all upper-level PA courses, which already has PA 300 as a pre-requisite. Hence, there will no longer be a hidden pre-requisite for upper-level PA courses.

Also, PA 395, which is currently a part of the Department Core, will be moved to all of the PA BS Concentrations.


Section IV: New Courses

Proposed New Courses for the Department of Social and Behavioral Science AIV.1

Department(s)

Social and Behavioral Science  

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

AWS

Course Number

101

Course Title

Introduction to Africana World Studies

Short Description

Introduction to Africana World Studies

Catalogue Description

This introductory survey course introduces students to Africana World Studies as a field of study from diverse disciplinary perspectives, including the humanities, social sciences, and the arts through an overview of the so- cio-economic, historical, psychological, political and cultural experiences of African peoples on the continent of Africa and throughout the Diaspora. Particular attention is given to the physical, cultural and intellectual move- ments as well as on the role of race, class, and gender in assessing similarities and differences in experiences throughout the broader Africana World. Further, the course is designed to give students a concise understanding of the heritage of African people and a framework to analyze the culture and institutional interactions which both shaped the African Diaspora and was shaped by people of African descent

Prerequisites

None

Co-requisites

ENGL 112

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

  X      Not Applicable

 

Rationale. This introductory survey course is necessary to provide foundational content for the discipline. In addition to highlighting the rele- vance of the field to contemporary study, it grounds students in key theories and methodologies that are necessary for advanced study in Africana World Studies through an inter-disciplinary and transnational lens.

 

AIV.2

 

Department(s)

Social and Behavioral Science

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

AWS

Course Number

300

Course Title

Women in Africa and the African Diaspora

Short Description

Women in Africa and the African Diaspora

Catalogue Description

Women in continental Africa and throughout the African Diaspora from the earliest times to the present are exam- ined. Focus is placed on the dispersal, growth and influence of women of African descent throughout various lo- calities of the world. Emphasis includes commonalities as well as differences in regional experiences within the Diaspora. Various primary and secondary sources are utilized to assess the historical, socio-economic, cultural, and religious roles, positions, and experiences of women within an interdisciplinary context.

Prerequisites

One of the following: HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 200, HIST 201, HIST 208, ANTH 200, ANTH 201, AWS 101,

POL 101, SOC 101, SSC 101; and ENGL 150

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

  X   Not Applicable

 

Rationale. This course will be an added elective to the BA in Liberal Studies degree program and a core requirement in a proposed new de- gree program. Having a fundamental understanding of the position of women of African descent in a global context is critical to understanding the dynamics that continue their interactions, advancement, and challenges.

 

Proposed New Courses for the Department of English

 

AIV.3

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

340

Course Title

Resistance and Reformation in Early African American Literature

Short Description

Resistance and Reformation in Early African American Literature

Catalogue Description

This course examines the ways in which early African American texts represent a tradition of resistance and reformation and contribute to an understanding of political, philosophical and religious beliefs and ideals in early African American literature. Students will examine oratory, letters, essays, slave narratives, poems, autobiog- raphies, and fiction from the Atlantic Slave Trade to 1910. Readings include Olaudah Equiano, Phillis Wheatley, David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Frances E. Harper, Sojourner Truth, Harriet Jacobs, Martin Delany, William Wells Brown, and Ida B Wells-Barnett.

Prerequisites

ENGL 150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Socio-Cultural, and Diversity Cluster

 

Rationale. As part of the English BA, this course will focus on the themes of resistance and activism in early African American Literature. It will introduce students to the historical, political and sociological diversity of the African American experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language

 

AIV.4

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

341

Course Title

The Harlem Renaissance: At Home in the World

Short Description

The Harlem Renaissance: At Home in the World

Catalogue Description

This course reads the Harlem Renaissance through the lens of the African diaspora with a focus on international- ism. Although geographically located in Harlem, NYC, the literary work of the period is preoccupied with global spaces beyond the United States. Many Harlem Renaissance texts include key dramatic scenes in other countries, and some are staged completely outside of Harlem. Therefore, we will analyze the particular aesthetic codes the Harlem Renaissance produces, and learn about the debates that shape this unique literary arts movement at "home" in Harlem, and abroad. What do we learn from the anxious encounters of peoples of African descent in Har- lem Renaissance life and literature? We will pay special attention to understanding Harlem Renaissance literature through the lens of queer identities that trouble prescribed sexual and gender roles in Harlem Renaissance litera- ture and life.

Prerequisites

ENGL 211 or ENGL 212

Co-requisites

N/A

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Frequency:

Every three semesters

Anticipated Enrollment

Spring Semester

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Socio-Cultural and Diversity Cluster

Rationale: As part of the English B.A program, and using literature and the anchor disciplines of the Humanities, this course will expand students' knowledge about social or global problems through cross-disciplinary analysis. Students will gain a more comprehensive perspec- tive that broadens their understanding of the interrelationships between disciplines and enhance their ability to comprehend and contribute to

 

contemporary discourse about the human experience. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and sexual differences via intersectional analysis of texts, and global, socio-political events in the context of the Harlem Renaissance.

13

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

342

Course Title

Transforming American Literature: U.S. Latina/o/x Texts

Short Description

Transforming American Literature: U.S. Latina/o/x Texts

Catalogue Description

U.S. Latina/o/x literature bears a distinct force in American letters, and its impression upon our national identity transforms the American "grand narrative". This course will explore how different forms of Latina/o/x literature produce new social, political, and aesthetic knowledge in American arts and letters, identity, and culture. Literary voices will be drawn from Puerto Rican, Mexican, Dominican, Cuban, and other Latin American migrations to the US, as we investigate how U.S. Latina/o/x experiences of resistance and assimilation, exile, identity formation, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality shape the American social world. What new aesthetic forms are created by US Latina/o/x literature and culture, and how do such forms transform American literature and culture? Forms include poetry, autobiography, novel, film, and music. Other themes may include border and hybrid identity, (im)migration, bilingualism, political presence, mestizaje, and indigeneity.

Prerequisites

ENGL 150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Socio-Cultural and Diversity Cluster III

 

Rationale: As part of the English B.A. program, and using literature and the anchor disciplines of the Humanities, this course will expand students' knowledge about social or global problems through cross-disciplinary analysis. Students will gain a more comprehensive per- spective that broadens their understanding of the interrelationships between disciplines and enhance their ability to comprehend and con- tribute to contemporary discourse about the human experience. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and sexual differences via intersectional analysis of texts and global, socio-political events in the U.S Latina/o/x context.

 

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

343

Course Title

Slavery, Emancipation, and Empire in British Literature

Short Description

Slavery, Emancipation, and Empire in British Literature

Catalogue Description

This course studies the literature by and about Africans in Britain during slavery, emancipation, and empire with a particular focus on the 18th and 19th centuries, and examines the literary, political, and legal resistance to slavery. The course looks at the diverse experiences - in terms of gender, legal status, location and occupation of Africans living in Britain during the period. Focused mostly on Black British writers and on African diaspora authors whose works were influential in the British context, the course also addresses representations of Africans in British liter- ature and culture during the period.

Prerequisites

ENGL 211 or ENGL 212

Co-requisities

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Socio-Cultural and Diversity Cluster III

 

Rationale: This course will fulfill requirements for the BA in English. It is a more current formulation of British literature for students in the Eng- lish programs. This course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the human experience in vari- ous contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

344

Course Title

Windrush to Brexit and Beyond: "Race" and Nation in Contemporary British Literature

Short Description

Windrush to Brexit and Beyond: "Race" and Nation in Contemporary British Literature

Catalogue Description

This course will focus on literature by contemporary authors of Black British, Asian, and Minority Ethnic (BAME) backgrounds. It will examine texts from a range of genres in terms of their artistic innovations, their thematic concerns, and their relationship to broader cultural and social contexts. The historic arc begins after the Second World War with the arrival of Windrush Generation migrants from the Caribbean and continues with migrant, refu- gee, and British-born BAME writing to the present day. The course will examine changing constructs of "Blackness" and British national identity throughout the period and their literary manifestations. In addition to "race" and eth- nicity, the course will address other areas of difference and the intersecting cultural projects emerging throughout the period with Black feminist, LGBTQ, and other movements that have urged an inclusive vision of nation. The course will also examine opposing cultural discourses culminating in the Brexit decision to withdraw from the European Union.

Prerequisites

ENGL 211 or ENGL 212

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

Socio-Cultural and Diversity Cluster III

 

Rationale. This course will fulfill requirements for the BA in English. It is a more current formulation of contemporary British Literature for students in the English programs. This course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the hu- man experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

345

Course Title

Afro-European Literature and Culture Today

Short Description

Afro-European Literature and Culture Today

Catalogue Description

This interdisciplinary course focuses on the literary and cultural responses to questions of identity and belonging that people of African descent living in Europe experience today. Artistic production will be examined in terms of aesthetic innovation, historical colonial relationships, and current social, political, and economic debates surrounding migration, citizenship rights, and inequality. The course will examine the literature and culture of those claiming an identity that is both African and European, as well as address intersections with class, gender, sexuality, religion, and other areas of difference. In examining contemporary Afro-European transnational culture in a range of countries in Europe, the course will draw upon literature, film, figurative arts, and music, as well as on current sociological, political, and legal writings.

Prerequisites

ENGL 150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Educa- tion Component

College Option: Cluster IV: Integrative Knowledge

 

Rationale: This course will be a major elective for students in the BA of Liberal Studies degree and will be a major elective for other degrees currently in development (BA/BS of Sociology, BA/BS of Geography). Population geographers work in fields related to demographic analysis, in industries including federal, state, and municipal government, market research, and public health. The Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupa- tional Outlook Handbook identifies job titles including demographer, epidemiologist, survey researcher, regional planner, which the handbook ranks as having 'above average' job growth. Students in this course will gain industry relevant skills for analyzing demographic data and ap- plying demographic tools.

 

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

346

Course Title

Caribbean Spirits, Postcolonial Specters

Short Description

Caribbean Spirits, Postcolonial Specters

Catalogue Description

This course examines the preoccupation with the ghost, the specter, and hauntings in Caribbean literature. Students will sharpen critical thinking, reading, and writing skills by analyzing the ways Caribbean literature confronts historical and contemporary issues of enslavement, colonialism, national/linguistic difference, ethnic cleansing, and migration through the specter, the ghost, and historical hauntings. Caribbean writers reimagine the past through the use of spir- its and specters. Certain guiding questions this course asks may include: what haunts the Caribbean, and what sorts of work do ghosts, specters, and/or the dead enact in literature from the archipelago? Why are we drawn to ghosts; what sorts of knowledge do spectral and otherworldly encounters in Caribbean literature offer us? Some other themes include visual technologies versus minor narratives, transnationalism, gender and sexual difference.

Prerequisites

ENGL 211 or ENGL 212

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Socio-Cultural and Diversity Cluster III

 

Rationale: As part of the B.A.in English, this course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the human experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Student will also study how this diversity manifests itself in conduct and our interactions with one another. At the completion of this course, students will be better informed decision makers and be better able to engage other members of the human family, whether at the individual or group level. Specifically, stu- dents will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

347

Course Title

World on the Move: 20th and 21st Century Global Literature

Short Description

World on the Move: 20th and 21st Century Global Literature

Catalogue Description

This course focuses on the literary responses to 20th and 21st century experiences of political repression, war, genocide, and other human rights violations, as well as on environmental factors and globalization, that result in global migrations, diasporas, and an ever-growing number of refugees and asylum-seekers worldwide - often referred to as a "World on the Move." Artistic production will be examined in terms of both aesthetic innovation and the socio-economic and political contexts causing global migrations. The course will focus on the African di- aspora and on the diasporas of at least two other groups of people in different areas of the globe. The course will examine issues of "race," ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and religion in relation to forced migration and diaspora through a range of literary genres and other cultural representations.

Prerequisites

ENGL150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Com- ponent

College Option: Cluster III: Socio-Cultural Diversity

 

Rationale: This course will fulfill requirements for the BA in English; it will also fulfill the Cluster III: Socio-Cultural Diversity requirement in the College Option. This course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the human experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

348

Course Title

Global Feminisms: Writing Gender and Sexuality

Short Description

Global Feminisms: Writing Gender and Sexuality

Catalogue Description

This course introduces students to historical and contemporary debates in feminism and gender/sexuality studies. Global Feminisms analyzes the produ ction of gender and sexual difference articulated with race, ethnicity, class, religion, and nation within and across a variety of historical and cultural contexts and throughout diverse textual and multimedia examples. A guiding question of the course asks: what is the difference between gender and sex- ual identity? We will focus on how such differences reflect the shaping of social roles in Western and non-Western societies. Another focus includes the issue of "normative" constructions of gender and sexuality and how they shape and affect human behavior. This course uses a variety of literary, theoretical, and feminist approaches.

Prerequisites

ENGL150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Cluster III: Socio-Cultural Diversity

 

Rationale:As part of the B.A.in English, and using literature and the anchor disciplines of the Humanities, this course will expand students' knowledge about social or global problems of gender and sexual difference in various global, historical, and contemporary contexts through cross and interdisciplinary analysis. Students will gain a more comprehensive perspective that broadens their understanding of the interrela- tionships between disciplines and enhance their ability to comprehend and contribute to contemporary discourse about the human experi- ence. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and sexual differences via intersectional analysis of texts and socio-political events in the context of global feminisms.

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

349

Course Title

Popular Culture: From Blackface to Black Panther

Short Description

Popular Culture: From Blackface to Black Panther

Catalogue Description

In this course on popular culture, students will assess from a variety of perspectives the origins and development of American and/or global popular culture. Students will critically analyze the ideas produced by popular culture and mass media in various forms and industries, including but not limited to popular music and video, television, film, thea- ter, visual art, radio, sports, fashion, and advertising, each of which shape our most powerful institutions, the social world, and individual lives. A guiding question the course asks is how does popular expression from a variety of cul- tures and industries shape our understanding of narrative, specifically in the production of gender, sexuality, race, eth- nicity, age, region, and social class? We will focus on what popular culture offers to us that other modes of expression do not, and consider the subversive potential of popular forms. Finally, students will learn how to place popular culture within its social, political, economic, and historical contexts. Instructor may focus upon a particular genre within popular culture, or a specific icon.

Prerequisites

ENGL150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Cluster III: Socio-Cultural Diversity

Rationale: This course will fulfill requirements in the English BA program. It addresses the force of narrative forms throughout the popular and mass media institutions that shape our contemporary and historical notions of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, social class, religion, and nation. Interdisciplinary and intersectional in method, "Popular Culture: From Blackface to Black Panther" introduces students to contempo- rary, historical, and intersectional diversity of the human experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, his- tory and language. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

351

Course Title

African Diaspora Women Writers

Short Description

African Diaspora Women Writers

Catalogue Description

African Diaspora Women Writers focuses on women's writing throughout the global community of the African diaspora. One of the primary questions the course poses is: can we define a tradition or traditions within African diaspora women's writing, in light of the cultural, national, and linguistic diversity of black women? We will focus on how the recurring motifs, themes, and styles shape the writing of the women of the African diaspora, and we will consider how gender, sexual, religious, ethnic, and social class differences inflect the production of African diaspora women's writing. Finally, this course will consider the varieties of African diaspora women's feminism as a critical approach to combat systemic and institutionalized political inequities.

Prerequisites

ENGL150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Cluster IV: Integrative Knowledge

 

Rationale: This course is being added the current English BA program in order to update the program. Using literature and the anchor disci- plines of the Humanities, this course will expand students' knowledge about social or global problems through cross-disciplinary and intersec- tional analysis. Students will gain a more comprehensive perspective that broadens their understanding of the interrelationships between dis- ciplines and enhance their ability to comprehend and contribute to contemporary discourse about the human experience. Specifically, stu- dents will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and sexual differences via intersectional analysis of texts and global, socio-political events in the context of cross-cultural women's writing.

 

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

352

Course Title

Poetry of Place: Voices of Exile

Short Description

Poetry of Place: Voices of Exile

Catalogue Description

This course focuses on works of contemporary poetry that are products or concerns of displacement and migra- tion in the global space. Readings for this course will explore and analyze the historical, cultural and political in- fluence and impact on modern poetry through the thematic lens of "place." Select readings will explore the ideas of belonging, rejection, exile, immigration/emigration, displacement, and deracination. Students will examine works by poets from diverse countries and places, ranging from Africa, the Americas, Asia and the Caribbean.

Prerequisites

ENGL150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Cluster III: Socio-Cultural Diversity

 

Rationale: As part of the B.A.in English, this course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the human experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Specifically, students will demon- strate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [ ] Compensatory [ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

353

Course Title

Ethnographic Playwriting: Stories from the African Diaspora

Short Description

Ethnographic Playwriting: Stories from the African Diaspora

Catalogue Description

Ethnography is a methodology that refers to the study of an individual or a community's customs and cultures. Through conducting ethnographic studies, we can encounter our own communities in new ways and come into con- tact with communities outside of our own. Such study and experience is essential to playwriting as a method to docu- ment, critique, and challenge the world in which we live. Through literary review, interview-based ethnographic field- work in the African Diaspora, and dramatic writing workshops, this course will help students find ways to enter or en- gage a community, document their individual lives, and document their communities in ethnographic plays. In this course, students will read research-based poetry, drama, fiction, and essays by and about people of African descent in the Diaspora. Students will learn ethnographic research methods and conduct interviews with members of a locally based Diaspora community and write plays based on these interviews. The course will use diverse methods of in- struction, including lecture, in-class and online discussion, and group work.

Prerequisites

ENGL150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Cluster IV: Integrative Knowledge

 

Rationale: As part of the B.A. in English, this course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the human experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Specifically, students will demon- strate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

 

FROM:

TO:

Department(s)

English

Department(s)

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [ ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Academic Level

N/C

Subject Area

ENGL

Subject Area

N/C

Course Prefix & Number

ENGL 308

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Title

Discourse Analysis in Contemporary Cultures

Course Title

N/C

Description

Discourse analysis is a linguistic tool that pays close attention to language in use, oral or written, and offers insight into in- quiries across the disciplines. The course will examine dis- course as a form of social action that has its impact on inter- personal, cultural, and political communications. The aim is to introduce students to major frameworks and current issues in discourse analysis. With knowledge of theoretical and applied discourse analysis, students will be guided through the field of applied linguistics. The course will explore oral and written dis- course strategies, power relationships between interlocutors, and cohesion/coherence indicators in textual and contextual analysis. This course is open to all students and is designed primarily for English BA and Education majors. This is an ADA- compliant course with complete online and voice accommoda- tion. This course fulfills General Education Requirements de- scribed in the LOs section.

Description

N/C

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: ENGL 150 Co-requisites: None

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

Credits

3

Credits

N/C

Hours

3

Hours

N/C

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

N/C

 

Proposed changes in existing courses in the Department of English AV.1

 

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing In- tensive, WAC, etc.)

N/A

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing In- tensive, WAC, etc.)

 

General Educa- tion Component

X_ Not Applicable Required

English Composition Mathematics Science

Flexible

World Cultures

US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Individual and Society

General Education Com- ponent

College Option Integrated Knowledge Cluster: Humanities & the Arts

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

 

AV.2

 

FROM:

TO:

Department(s)

English

Department(s)

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [ ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Academic Level

N/C

Subject Area

ENGL

Subject Area

N/C

Course Prefix & Number

ENGL 361

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Title

Shakespeare

Course Title

Shakespeare Without Borders

Description

This course examines selected Shake- spearean plays within the social, cul- tural, and political context of the Renais- sance. A brief history of the develop- ment of the drama and a study of Shakespeare's sources are included in the course.

Description

The course will examine works by Shakespeare and his influences from the Renaissance to the present. Students explore a variety of adaptations of Shake- speare's works from a global perspective and connect his works to the cultural and political context of his lit- erary descendants. Students also study adaptations of multiple genres, including novels, film, and music that

 

 

 

 

reinterpret or reimagine Shakespeare's works, paying close attention to the ways in which those reinterpre- tations and adaptations reflect traditions and changes in the historical, social, cultural and political context of the respective environments. Students will examine Shakespeare's works alongside respective adapta- tions ranging from Africa, the Americas, Asia to the Caribbean.

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: ENGL 150 Co-requisites: None

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

Credits

3

Credits

N/C

Hours

3

Hours

N/C

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

N/C

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Inten- sive, WAC, etc.)

N/A

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing In- tensive, WAC, etc.)

 

General Education Com- ponent

X_ Not Applicable Required

English Composition Mathematics Science

Flexible

World Cultures

US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression

      Individual and Society

General Education Com- ponent

College Option

Cluster III: Socio-Cultural Diversity

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

Rationale: As part of the English B.A. program, this course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersetional diversity of the human experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

AV.3

 

FROM:

 

TO

 

Depart- ment(s)

English

Departments

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [ ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Academic Level;

[x] Regular [ ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

 

 

Course Prefix &Number

ENGL 325

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Ti- tle

Caribbean Literature 1: Beginnings to 1970

Course Title

Caribbean Cosmopolitanism

Description

This course consists of selected readings in travel narratives, fiction, poetry, autobiography, and drama from major authors and texts beginning with European representations of the colonial en- counter in the Early Modern period and conclud- ing with the literature and literary movements of the independence era.

Description

The course will examine works by Shakespeare and his influences from the Renaissance to the present. Students explore a variety of adaptations of Shake- speare's works from a global perspective and connect his works to the cultural and political context of his lit- erary descendants. Students also study adaptations of multiple genres, including novels, film, and music that reinterpret or reimagine Shakespeare's works, paying close attention to the ways in which those reinterpre- tations and adaptations reflect traditions and changes in the historical, social, cultural and political context of the respective environments. Students will examine Shakespeare's works alongside respective adapta- tions ranging from Africa, the Americas, Asia to the Caribbean. Some other themes may include but are not limited to the issues of "discovery," enslavement, exile, (im)migration, ethnic cleansing, transnational- ism, literary and social revolutions.

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: ENGL 150 Co-requisite: None

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

 

Credits

3

Credits

 

Hours

3

Hours

 

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

 

Course Attrib- ute (e.g. Writ- ing Intensive, WAC, etc.)

NA

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing In- tensive, WAC, etc.)

N/C

General Education Component

X_ Not Applicable

      Required

      English Composition

      Mathematics

      Science

      Flexible

      World Cultures

      US Experience in its Diversity

      Creative Expression

General Education Component

College Option

Cluster III: Socio-Cultural Diversity

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

 

Rationale: As part of the B.A.in English, this course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the human experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, social-class, geography, culture, history and language. Student will also study how this diversity manifests itself in conduct and our interactions with one another. At the completion of the courses in this cluster, stu- dents will be better informed decision makers and they will be better able to engage other members of the human family, whether at the indi- vidual or group level. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural al differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

 

Proposed changes in Existing Courses in the Department of Public Administration AV.4

FROM:

 

TO

 

Department(s)

Public Administration

Departments

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [ ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Academic Level;

[x] Regular [ ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

 

Subject Area

PA

 

N/C

Course Prefix & Number

 

PA 300

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Title

Public Bureaucracy

Course Title

Public Bureaucracy and Disaster Management

Description

This course presents students with an over- view of organizational and institutional struc- ture on the Public Sector, key decision-mak- ers, politics, and the processes that com- prise American Public Bureaucracy will be explored.

Description

This course integrates two distinct but interrelated subject matters - public bureaucracy and disaster management. Disaster management is being used to enlighten students on bureaucratic theories and processes that often appear very difficult for stu- dents to learn due to its invisible nature. Students will gain both a theoretical and practical knowledge- base of bureaucracy through key examples of disas- ter management.

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: PA 225 Co-requisite:

None

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

Frequency

 

Frequency

Every Semester

Students Served

 

Students Served

PA Majors and Minors

Credits

3

Credits

N/C

Hours

3

Hours

N/C

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

N/C

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Inten- sive, WAC, etc.)

NA

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Inten- sive, WAC, etc.)

N/C

General Education Com- ponent

X_ Not Applicable Required

English Composition Mathematics Science

Flexible

World Cultures

US Experience in its Diversity

      Creative Expression

General Education Com- ponent

N/C

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

 

 

 

Rationale: The best way for a student to learn about public bureaucracy and bureaucratic culture is through an event that has a lasting im- pression on government; this is usually in the form of an emergency, crisis, or disaster. Given that bureaucracy can be an invisible subject matter that may appear difficult to explain to students, we sought to integrate a very visible subject matter that demands the usage of bureau- cratic controls and politics in order to either prepare for it, or to mitigate any response or damage.

 

 

The surge in disasters and worldwide emergencies has soared since 911, Hurricane Katrina, and almost annually since Hurricane Sandy, and this year with the COVID-19 global pandemic. When disasters and emergencies appear, it naturally demands a response that initiates a bu- reaucratic machinery at all levels of government. It brings into play a response from each level of government that has jurisdiction over the affected areas. Hence, the subject matters of emergency and disaster management cannot be taught without having in-depth discussions that involves the gist of public bureaucracy. Whether it is a chain of command issue, a jurisdiction issue, or a rules and procedure issue, the theory of bureaucracy must be discussed. As a result, it is fitting that public bureaucracy, a staple in the discipline of public administration become merged with this subject matter to allow for a, much-needed discourse on theories of preparedness but also having an ability to re- spond with minimal disruptions. More importantly, this course will focus on who needs to be called upon to respond and the best methodolo- gies to get them to respond in a "time is of the essence fashion".

 

AV.5

 

FROM:

 

TO

 

Department(s)

Public Administration

Departments

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [ ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Academic Level;

[x] Regular [ ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Subject Area

PA

 

 

Course Prefix & Number

 

PA 395

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Title

Public Administration and Disaster Manage- ment

Course Title

Case Studies in Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Management

Description

This course aims at providing a broad under- standing of the strategic role and functions of the public administrative system in the context of dis- asters. It will examine the bureaucratic arrange- ments of disaster-related agencies and institu- tions, such as the Federal Emergency Manage- ment Agency (FEMA) and the Caribbean Disas- ter Emergency Response Agency (CDERA), to understand their capacities to reasonably predict and aggressively respond to both natural and hu- man-associated disasters. The course will en- gage in a comparative study of the more well known national disaster response agencies in the disaster-prone regions of the world at the same time, will inquire into public administration best practices that have emerged

Description

This course will provide students with a variety of cases that will educate students all the differ- ent phases of emergency preparedness and dis- aster management. It will analyze in-depth, how to prepare, mitigate, respond, and recover for different emergencies and disasters. More im- portantly, students will learn about the different actors, agencies, organizations, and communi- ties, that must come together to make all seg- ments of society whole again.

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: PA 300 Co-requisite: None

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

Frequency

N/A

Frequency

Every Semester

Students Served

N/A

Students Served

PA Majors and Minors

Credits

3

Credits

 

 

Hours

3

Hours

 

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

 

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive,

WAC, etc.)

NA

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive,

WAC, etc.)

N/C

General Education Com- ponent

X_ Not Applicable Required

English Composition Mathematics Science

Flexible

World Cultures

US Experience in its Diversity

      Creative Expression

General Education Com- ponent

N/C

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

Rationale: A course, PA 300, was recently re-named Public Bureaucracy and Disaster Management. Hence, PA 300 now serves as the foundation course for educating students about Disaster Management. Thus, PA 395, needs to function as an upper-level course in Disaster Manager. PA 395 is being revised to empower students to assess a variety of real-life emergencies from every perspective. Students will evaluate a variety of case studies that provide clear, detailed, step-by-step explanations of major disasters or emergencies from around the globe. Topics include natural disasters, industrial accidents, epidemics, pandemics, and terrorist attacks. This course can be used to help prepare first responders, law enforcement, and government and nonprofit employees, for how to be proactive in this new world order.

 

 

Changes to Existing Courses in the Department of World Languages and Cultures AV.6

FROM:

TO:

Department(s)

World Languages and Cultures

Department(s)

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [ ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Academic Level

N/C

Subject Area

CHIN

Subject Area

N/C

 

Course Prefix & Number

CHIN 101

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Title

Beginning Chinese I

Course Title

N/C

Description

The course is an introduction to the study of the Chinese (Mandarin) language as a medium of communication. It will focus primarily on the acquisition of pronunciation and production of fundamental speaking, listening, read- ing and writing skills. In this basic course, speaking is a priority and will be the foundation for students' further development of their practice in Chinese (Mandarin).

One-hour weekly attendance in the Language Labora- tory is required. The course is not open to native speak- ers of Chinese or students with prior exposure or ac- quired proficiency in the language

Description

N/C

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: N/A

Co-requisites: CHIL 101- Chinese Lab 101

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

Credits

3

Credits

N/C

Hours

3

Hours

N/C

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

N/C

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing In- tensive, WAC, etc.)

N/A

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing In- tensive, WAC, etc.)

N/C

General Education Component

X_ Not Applicable Required

English Composition Mathematics Science

Flexible

World Cultures

US Experience in its Diversity

      Creative Expression

General Educa- tion Component

College Option

Socio-Cultural, and Diversity Cluster Integrated Knowledge Cluster: Hu- manities and the Arts

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

 

AV.7

 

FROM:

TO:

Department(s)

World Languages and Cultures

Department(s)

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [ ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Academic Level

N/C

Subject Area

CHIN

Subject Area

N/C

Course Prefix & Number

CHIN 102

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Title

Beginning Chinese II

Course Title

N/C

Description

The course is the continuation of the previous semester of Chi- nese (Mandarin) as a medium of communication. It will focus primarily on the acquisition of pronunciation and production of fundamental speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. In this basic course, speaking is a priority and will be the founda- tion for students' further development of their practice in Chi- nese (Mandarin). One hour weekly attendance in the Language Laboratory is required. The course is not open to native speak- ers of Chinese or to students with prior exposure or with gen- eral proficiency in the language.

Description

N/C

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: N/A

Co-requisites: CHIL 102- Chinese Lab 102

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

Credits

3

Credits

N/C

Hours

3

Hours

N/C

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

N/C

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Inten- sive, WAC, etc.)

N/A

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing In- tensive, WAC, etc.)

N/C

General

Education Compo- nent

X_ Not Applicable

      Required

      English Composition

General Education Com- ponent*

College Option

Socio-Cultural, and Diversity Cluster

 

 

Mathematics Science Flexible

World Cultures

US Experience in its Diversity

      Creative Expression

 

Integrated Knowledge Clus- ter: Humanities and the Arts

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

 

Section VI: Courses Withdrawn NONE

 

 

Section VII: Affiliation Agreements NONE

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Medgar Evers College

Academic University Report Detail November/December 2020

 

PART A: ACADEMIC MATTERS

 

Section AII: Special Actions NONE

 

Section II: Changes in Generic Degree Requirements NONE

 

Section III: Changes in Degree Programs

 

AIII.1 The following revisions are proposed for the BS in Public Administration Program: BS in Public Administration

Program Codes: 2102 (HEGIS)

Effective: Fall 2020

 

Description: The addition of PA 300 to the Department Core; the Removal of PA 395 from Department Core and the addition of PA 395 to all PA Degree Concentrations - Criminal Justice, Law and Public Policy, International Administration, Comparative Administration, Community Development, and General Concentration

 

From

From

Course                                                                                          Credits

Course                                                                                            Credits

BS - Public Administration Major Requirements

ACCT 217       Principles of Accounting                        3

CIS 101           Computer Fundamentals                        3

CIS 211           Internet and Emerging Technology                        3

ECON 212      Macroeconomics                        3

FS 101            Freshman Seminar 101                        3

LAW 208         The Legal Environment of Business                        3

LIB 100            Library and Research Methods                        2

MTH 213         Introduction to Statistics                        3

PA 103            Introduction to Public Service and Administration 3 PA 150                        Introduction to Criminal Law                        3

Or

PA 260            Constitutional Law                        3

PA 200            Introduction to Nonprofit Administration                        3

Or

PA 215            Designing Local Programs                        3

PA 205            Public Personnel                        3

PA 211            NYS and Local Government                        3

PA 225            Introduction to Public Policy                        3

PA 285            International Administration                        3

Department of Public Administration Proposed Department Core- BS Degree

CIS 101           Computer Fundamentals                          3

CIS 211           Internet and Emerging Technology           3

FS 101            Freshman Seminar I                                 1

FS 102            Freshman Seminar II                                1

LIB 100            Library and Research Methods                 2

MTH 213         Introduction to Statistics                            3

PA 103            Introduction to Public Service and Administration 3 PA 150       Introduction to Criminal Law

Or

PA 260            Constitutional Law                                    3

PA 200            Introduction to Nonprofit Administration   3

Or

PA 215            Designing Local Programs                       3

PA 205            Public Personnel                                       3

PA 211            NYS and Local Government                     3

PA 214            Organization Theory

PA 225            Public Policy and Caseload Management                        3

PA 285            Administration of Global Institutions         3

 

PA 290            Internship I                              3

PA 325            Fiscal Administration                3

PA 326            Ethics in Government             3

PA 390            Research Methods and Statistics          3

PA 395            Public Administration and Disaster Management                                     3

PA 407            Comparative Public Administration 3

OR

PA 486            Global Public Policy                3

PA 490            Internship (Capstone Course) 3

PAXXX            Elective                                    3

 

 

 

Concentration -12 Credits:

Choose One from the List Below

Law Pathways/Criminal Justice Administration:

required for students pursuing careers in law enforcement PA 150- Introduction to Criminal Law

PA 235- Criminal Justice and Its Processes PA 250 - Parole and Probation

PA 275 -Community Policing

PA 365 -Crime and Punishment in Urban America PA 440 -Judicial Processes and Court Systems

 

International Administration

PA 395 - Public Administration and Disaster Management PA 407 - Comparative Administration

PA 450 -Decision Making

PA 480 -Globalization and Public Administration

PA 485 -Seminar: International Administration and Diplomacy PA 486 -Global Public Policy

PA 290            Internship I

PA 300*           Public Bureaucracy and Disaster Management   3 PA 325                        Fiscal Administration                        3

PA 326            Ethics in Government                        3

PA 390            Research Methods and Statistics                        3

PA 407            Comparative Public Administration                        3

OR

PA 486            Global Public Policy                        3

PA 413            Program Evaluation                        3

PA 450            Decision-making in Government (Capstone)      3

PA 490            Internship II                        3

Electives                                                                                               12

Grand Total                                                                                               78

 

Concentration- 12 Credits:

Choose One Concentration from the List Below Law Pathways/Criminal Justice Administration:

required for students pursuing careers in Law Enforcement PA 235 -Criminal Justice and Its Processes

PA 250 -Parole and Probation PA 275 - Community Policing PA 311-GIS Applications

PA 365 -Crime and Punishment in Urban America (If Not Taken as Part of the College Option)

PA 395* - Cases Studies in Emergency and Disaster Management PA 415 - Policymaking and the Public Interest

PA 440 -Judicial Processes and Court Systems

 

International Administration

ACCT 217 -Principles of Accounting

LAW 208 -Legal Environment of Business

PA 395* - Cases Studies in Emergency and Disaster Management PA 407 -Comparative Administration

(lf Not Taken in Department Core) PA 415 -Policymaking and the Public Interest ECON 430/PA 430 -War on Drugs

PA 480 -Globalization and Public Administration

PA 485 - Seminar: International Administration and Diplomacy PA-486 - Global Public Policy (If not taken in Department Core)

 

 

Non-Profit Administration

PA 330- Public Policy, Advocacy, and Services for the Aged

PA 335 -Principles of Philanthropy, Fundraising, and Development PA 340 -Strategic Planning, Budgeting, and Project Management PA 395 -Public Administration and Disaster Management

PA 450 -Decision Making

PA 410 -Administrative Rules and Regulations PA 413 -Public Program Evaluation

 

 

Public Policy

PA 3XX- Blacks in Government PA 30I - Education Policy

PA 315 -Case Studies in Public Policy

PA 330 - Public Policy, Advocacy, and Services for the Aged PA 405 -NYC Administration

PA 410 -Administrative Rules and Regulations PA 413 - Public Program Evaluation

PA 415 - Policymaking and the Public Interest ECON 430/PA 430 -War on Drugs

PA 450 -Decision Making PA 486 -Global Public Policy

 

 

Community Development/Urban Administration PA 3XX- Blacks in Government

PA 325 -Fiscal Administration

PA 340 - Strategic Planning, Budgeting, and Project Management PA 350 -Theories of Urban Administration

PA 365 -Crime and Punishment in Urban America

PA 395 -Public Administration and Disaster Management PA 405 -NYC Administration

PA 410 -Administrative Rules and Regulations PA 413 -Public Program Evaluation

PA 450 -Decision Making

Non-Profit Administration

ACCT 217 -Principals of Accounting

LAW 208 -Legal Environment of Business PA 301 - Education Policy

PA 330 - Public Policy, Advocacy, and Services for the Aged

PA 335 -Principles of Philanthropy, Fundraising, and Development PA 340 -Strategic Planning, Budgeting, and Project Management PA 395* - Case Studies in Emergency and Disaster Management PA 410 -Administrative Rules and Regulations

PA 415 -Policymaking and the Public Interest

 

Law and Public Policy

ACCT 217 -Principals of Accounting

LAW 208 - Legal Environment of Business PA 3XX- Blacks in Government

PA 301 -Education Policy PA 311 -GIS Applications

PA 315 -Case Studies in Public Policy

PA 330 -Public Policy, Advocacy, and Services for the Aged

PA 395* - Cases Studies in Emergency and Disaster Management PA 405 -NYC Administration

PA 410 -Administrative Rules and Regulations PA 415 -Policymaking and the Public Interest ECON 430/PA 430 -War on Drugs

PA 486 -Global Public Policy (If Not taken in Department Core)

 

Community Development

ACCT 217 - Principals of Accounting LAW 208 -Legal Environment of Business PA 3XX- Blacks in Government

PA 311 -GIS Applications

PA 340 - Strategic Planning, Budgeting, and Project Management PA 350- Theories of Urban Administration

PA 365 -Crime and Punishment in Urban America (If Not Taken as Part of the College Option)

PA 395* - Cases Studies in Emergency and Disaster Management PA 405 -NYC Administration

PA 410 -Administrative Rules and Regulations PA 415 -Policymaking and the Public Interest

 

 

 

General Concentration

ACCT 208 - Principals of Accounting

LAW 208 - Legal Environment of Business PA 235 - Criminal Justice and Its Processes PA 250 - Parole and Probation

PA 275 - Community Policing PA 3XX - Blacks in Government PA 311 - GIS Applications

PA 315 - Case Studies in Public Policy

PA 330 - Public Policy, Advocacy, and Services for the Aged

PA 335-Principles of Philanthropy, Fundraising, and Development PA 340 - Strategic Planning, Budgeting, and Project Management PA 350 - Theories of Urban Administration

PA 365 - Crime and Punishment in Urban America (If Not Taken as Part of the College Option)

PA 395* - Cases Studies in Emergency and Disaster Management PA 405 - NYC Administration

PA 407 - Comparative Administration

(If Not Taken in Department Core}

PA 410 - Administrative Rules and Regulations PA 415 - Policymaking and the Public Interest ECON 430/PA 430 -War on Drugs

(If Not Taken as Part of the College Option) PA 440 - Judicial Processes and Court Systems PA 480 - Globalization and Public Administration

PA 485 - Seminar: International Administration and Diplomacy PA 486 - Global Public Policy (If Not taken in Department Core)

 

 

ENGL 112

Composition I

3

ENOL 150

College Composition II

3

BIO 101

Introduction to the Science of Biology

3

PHS 101

Introduction to Physical Science

3

MTH 136

Algebra and Trigonometry

3

ENGL 212

World Literature: The Evolving Canon

3

ART 100

Introduction to World Art

3

Or

MUS 100

 

Introduction to World Music

 

3

HlST 200

Growth and Development of the US

3

ECON 212

Principles of Macroeconomics

3

SSC 101

Culture, Society, and Change

3

Or

SOC 101

 

Introduction to Sociology

 

3

BIO 211

Biotechnology and Society

3

Total

 

30

 

College Option (12 Credits)

Foreign Language I/Foreign Language II

 

 

6

One Socio-Cultural

3

One Integrative Knowledge

3

Total

12

Grand Total

42

 

 

 

 

General Education Requirements

Rationale: PA 300 was originally a part of the Department Core but was removed and subsequently became a hidden pre-requisite for all upper level PA courses. It is now being re-designed and renamed and can once again serve as the pre-requisite to all upper-level PA courses, which already has PA 300 as a pre-requisite. Hence, there will no longer be a hidden pre-requisite for upper-level PA courses. Also, PA 395, which is currently a part of the Department Core, will be moved to all of the PA BS Concentrations.

 

Department(s)

Social and Behavioral Science

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

AWS

Course Number

101

Course Title

Introduction to Africana World Studies

Short Description

Introduction to Africana World Studies

Catalogue Description

This introductory survey course introduces students to Africana World Studies as a field of study from diverse disciplinary perspectives, including the humanities, social sciences, and the arts through an overview of the socio-economic, historical, psychological, political and cultural experiences of African peoples on the continent of Africa and throughout the Diaspora. Particular attention is given to the physical, cultural and intellectual movements as well as on the role of race, class, and gender in assessing similarities and differences in expe- riences throughout the broader Africana World. Further, the course is designed to give students a concise un- derstanding of the heritage of African people and a framework to analyze the culture and institutional interac- tions which both shaped the African Diaspora and was shaped by people of African descent

Prerequisites

None

Co-requisites

ENGL 112

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

  X     Not Applicable

 

Section IV: New Courses AIV.1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rationale. This introductory survey course is necessary to provide foundational content for the discipline. In addition to highlighting the relevance of the field to contemporary study, it grounds students in key theories and methodologies that are necessary for advanced study in Africana World Studies through an inter-disciplinary and transnational lens.

 

AIV.2

Department(s)

Social and Behavioral Science

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

AWS

Course Number

300

Course Title

Women in Africa and the African Diaspora

Short Description

Women in Africa and the African Diaspora

Catalogue Description

Women in continental Africa and throughout the African Diaspora from the earliest times to the present

are examined. Focus is placed on the dispersal, growth and influence of women of African descent throughout various localities of the world. Emphasis includes commonalities as well as differences in regional experiences within the Diaspora. Various primary and secondary sources are utilized to assess the historical, socio- economic, cultural, and religious roles, positions, and experiences of women within an interdisciplinary context.

Prerequisites

One of the following: HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 200, HIST 201, HIST 208, ANTH 200, ANTH 201, AWS 101,

POL 101, SOC 101, SSC 101; and ENGL 150

ANTH 201, AWS 101, POL 101, SOC 101, SSC 101;

and

ENGL 150

One of the following: HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 200, HIST 201, HIST 208, ANTH 200, ANTH 201, AWS 101,

POL 101, SOC 101, SSC 101;

and

ENGL 150

One of the following: HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 200, HIST 201, HIST 208, ANTH 200, ANTH 201, AWS 101,

POL 101, SOC 101, SSC 101;

and

ENGL 150

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

 X Not Applicable

Rationale.This course will be an added elective to the BA in Liberal Studies degree program and a core requirement in a proposed new degree program. Having a fundamental understanding of the position of women of African descent in a global context is critical to un- derstanding the dynamics that continue their interactions, advancement, and challenges.

 

AIV.3

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

Resistance and Reformation in Early African American Literature

Short Description

Resistance and Reformation in Early African American Literature

Catalogue Description

This course examines the ways in which early African American texts represent a tradition of resistance and reformation and contribute to an understanding of political, philosophical and religious beliefs and ideals in early African American literature. Students will examine oratory, letters, essays, slave narratives, poems, au- tobiographies, and fiction from the Atlantic Slave Trade to 1910. Readings include Olaudah Equiano, Phillis Wheatley, David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Frances E. Harper, Sojourner Truth, Harriet Jacobs, Martin Delany, William Wells Brown, and Ida B Wells-Barnett.

Prerequisites

ENGL 150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Socio-Cultural, and Diversity Cluster

 

Rationale. As part of the English BA, this course will focus on the themes of resistance and activism in early African American Litera- ture. It will introduce students to the historical, political and sociological diversity of the African American experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language.

 

AIV.4

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

The Harlem Renaissance: At Home in the World

Short Description

The Harlem Renaissance: At Home in the World

Catalogue Description

This course reads the Harlem Renaissance through the lens of the African diaspora with a focus on interna- tionalism. Although geographically located in Harlem, NYC, the literary work of the period is preoccupied with global spaces beyond the United States. Many Harlem Renaissance texts include key dramatic scenes in other countries, and some are staged completely outside of Harlem. Therefore, we will analyze the particular aesthetic codes the Harlem Renaissance produces and learn about the debates that shape this unique liter- ary arts movement at "home" in Harlem, and abroad. What do we learn from the anxious encounters of peo- ples of African descent in Harlem Renaissance life and literature? We will pay special attention to under- standing Harlem Renaissance literature through the lens of queer identities that trouble prescribed sexual and gender roles in Harlem Renaissance literature and life.

Prerequisites

ENGL 211 or ENGL 212

Co-requisites

N/A

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Frequency:

Every three semesters

Anticipated Enrollment

Spring Semester

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Socio-Cultural and Diversity Cluster

Rationale: As part of the English B.A program, and using literature and the anchor disciplines of the Humanities, this course will ex- pand students' knowledge about social or global problems through cross-disciplinary analysis. Students will gain a more comprehen- sive perspective that broadens their understanding of the interrelationships between disciplines and enhance their ability to compre- hend and contribute to contemporary discourse about the human experience. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and sexual differences via intersectional analysis of texts, and global, socio-political events in the context of the Harlem Renaissance.

13

 

AIV.5

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

Transforming American Literature: U.S. Latina/o/x Texts

Short Description

Transforming American Literature: U.S. Latina/o/x Texts

Catalogue Description

U.S. Latina/o/x literature bears a distinct force in American letters, and its impression upon our national identity transforms the American "grand narrative". This course will explore how different forms of Latina/o/x literature produce new social, political, and aesthetic knowledge in American arts and letters, identity, and culture. Liter- ary voices will be drawn from Puerto Rican, Mexican, Dominican, Cuban, and other Latin American migrations to the US, as we investigate how U.S. Latina/o/x experiences of resistance and assimilation, exile, identity formation, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality shape the American social world. What new aesthetic forms are created by US Latina/o/x literature and culture, and how do such forms transform American literature and culture? Forms include poetry, autobiography, novel, film, and music. Other themes may include border and hybrid identity, (im)migration, bilingualism, political presence, mestizaje, and indigeneity.

Prerequisites

ENGL 150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Socio-Cultural and Diversity Cluster III

 

Rationale:

As part of the English B.A. program, and using literature and the anchor disciplines of the Humanities, this course will expand stu- dents' knowledge about social or global problems through cross-disciplinary analysis. Students will gain a more comprehensive per- spective that broadens their understanding of the interrelationships between disciplines and enhance their ability to comprehend and contribute to contemporary discourse about the human experience. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreci- ate gender and sexual differences via intersectional analysis of texts and global, socio-political events in the U.S Latina/o/x context.

 

AIV.6

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

Slavery, Emancipation, and Empire in British Literature

Short Description

Slavery, Emancipation, and Empire in British Literature

Catalogue Description

This course studies the literature by and about Africans in Britain during slavery, emancipation, and empire with a particular focus on the 18th and 19th centuries, and examines the literary, political, and legal resistance to slavery. The course looks at the diverse experiences - in terms of gender, legal status, location and occu- pation of Africans living in Britain during the period. Focused mostly on Black British writers and on African diaspora authors whose works were influential in the British context, the course also addresses representa- tions of Africans in British literature and culture during the period.

Prerequisites

ENGL 211 or ENGL 212

Co-requisities

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Socio-Cultural and Diversity Cluster III

 

Rationale:

This course will fulfill requirements for the BA in English. It is a more current formulation of British literature for students in the English programs. This course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the human experience in var- ious contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better abil- ity to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

AIV.7

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

Windrush to Brexit and Beyond: "Race" and Nation in Contemporary British Literature

Short Description

Windrush to Brexit and Beyond: "Race" and Nation in Contemporary British Literature

Catalogue Description

This course will focus on literature by contemporary authors of Black British, Asian, and Minority Ethnic (BAME) backgrounds. It will examine texts from a range of genres in terms of their artistic innovations, their thematic concerns, and their relationship to broader cultural and social contexts. The historic arc begins after the Second World War with the arrival of Windrush Generation migrants from the Caribbean and continues with migrant, refugee, and British-born BAME writing to the present day. The course will examine changing constructs of "Blackness" and British national identity throughout the period and their literary manifestations. In addition to "race" and ethnicity, the course will address other areas of difference and the intersecting cultural projects emerging throughout the period with Black feminist, LGBTQ, and other movements that have urged an inclusive vision of nation. The course will also examine opposing cultural discourses culminating in the Brexit decision to withdraw from the European Union.

Prerequisites

ENGL 211 or ENGL 212

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

Socio-Cultural and Diversity Cluster III

 

Rationale.

This course will fulfill requirements for the BA in English. It is a more current formulation of contemporary British Literature for students in the English programs. This course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the human ex- perience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Specifically, students will demon- strate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

AIV.8

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

Afro-European Literature and Culture Today

Short Description

Afro-European Literature and Culture Today

Catalogue Description

This interdisciplinary course focuses on the literary and cultural responses to questions of identity and belong- ing that people of African descent living in Europe experience today. Artistic production will be examined in terms of aesthetic innovation, historical colonial relationships, and current social, political, and economic de- bates surrounding migration, citizenship rights, and inequality. The course will examine the literature and cul- ture of those claiming an identity that is both African and European, as well as address intersections with class, gender, sexuality, religion, and other areas of difference. In examining contemporary Afro-European transna- tional culture in a range of countries in Europe, the course will draw upon literature, film, figurative arts, and music, as well as on current sociological, political, and legal writings.

Prerequisites

ENGL 150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Cluster IV: Integrative Knowledge

 

Rationale: This course will be a major elective for students in the BA of Liberal Studies degree and will be a major elective for other de- grees currently in development (BA/BS of Sociology, BA/BS of Geography). Population geographers work in fields related to demo- graphic analysis, in industries including federal, state, and municipal government, market research, and public health. The Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Outlook Handbook identifies job titles including demographer, epidemiologist, survey researcher, regional planner, which the handbook ranks as having 'above average' job growth. Students in this course will gain industry relevant skills for analyzing demographic data and applying demographic tools.

 

AIV.9

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

Caribbean Spirits, Postcolonial Specters

Short Description

Caribbean Spirits, Postcolonial Specters

Catalogue Description

This course examines the preoccupation with the ghost, the specter, and hauntings in Caribbean literature. Students will sharpen critical thinking, reading, and writing skills by analyzing the ways Caribbean literature confronts historical and contemporary issues of enslavement, colonialism, national/linguistic difference, ethnic cleansing, and migration through the specter, the ghost, and historical hauntings. Caribbean writers reimagine the past through the use of spirits and specters. Certain guiding questions this course asks may include: what haunts the Caribbean, and what sorts of work do ghosts, specters, and/or the dead enact in literature from the archipelago? Why are we drawn to ghosts; what sorts of knowledge do spectral and otherworldly encounters in Caribbean literature offer us? Some other themes include visual technologies versus minor narratives, transnationalism, gender and sexual difference.

Prerequisites

ENGL 211 or ENGL 212

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Socio-Cultural and Diversity Cluster III

 

Rationale: As part of the B.A.in English, this course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the human experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Student will also study how this diversity manifests itself in conduct and our interactions with one another. At the completion of this course, students will be bet- ter informed decision makers and be better able to engage other members of the human family, whether at the individual or group level. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in con- structive resolutions of conflict.

 

AIV.10

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

World on the Move: 20th and 21st Century Global Literature

Short Description

World on the Move: 20th and 21st Century Global Literature

Catalogue Description

This course focuses on the literary responses to 20th and 21st century experiences of political repression, war, genocide, and other human rights violations, as well as on environmental factors and globalization, that result in global migrations, diasporas, and an ever-growing number of refugees and asylum-seekers worldwide - of- ten referred to as a "World on the Move." Artistic production will be examined in terms of both aesthetic innova- tion and the socio-economic and political contexts causing global migrations. The course will focus on the Afri- can diaspora and on the diasporas of at least two other groups of people in different areas of the globe. The course will examine issues of "race," ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and religion in relation to forced migration and diaspora through a range of literary genres and other cultural representations.

Prerequisites

ENGL150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Cluster III: Socio-Cultural Diversity

 

Rationale: This course will fulfill requirements for the BA in English; it will also fulfill the Cluster III: Socio-Cultural Diversity requirement in the College Option. This course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the human expe- rience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

AIV.11

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

Global Feminisms: Writing Gender and Sexuality

Short Description

Global Feminisms: Writing Gender and Sexuality

Catalogue Description

This course introduces students to historical and contemporary debates in feminism and gender/sexuality studies. Global Feminisms analyzes the produ ction of gender and sexual difference articulated with race, ethnicity, class, religion, and nation within and across a variety of historical and cultural contexts and through- out diverse textual and multimedia examples. A guiding question of the course asks: what is the difference be- tween gender and sexual identity? We will focus on how such differences reflect the shaping of social roles in Western and non-Western societies. Another focus includes the issue of "normative" constructions of gender and sexuality and how they shape and affect human behavior. This course uses a variety of literary, theoreti- cal, and feminist approaches.

Prerequisites

ENGL150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Cluster IV: Integrative Knowledge

 

Rationale: As part of the B.A.in English, and using literature and the anchor disciplines of the Humanities, this course will expand stu- dents' knowledge about social or global problems of gender and sexual difference in various global, historical, and contemporary con- texts through cross and interdisciplinary analysis. Students will gain a more comprehensive perspective that broadens their understand- ing of the interrelationships between disciplines and enhance their ability to comprehend and contribute to contemporary discourse about the human experience. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and sexual differences via in- tersectional analysis of texts and socio-political events in the context of global feminisms.

 

AIV.12

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

Popular Culture: From Blackface to Black Panther

Short Description

Popular Culture: From Blackface to Black Panther

Catalogue Description

In this course on popular culture, students will assess from a variety of perspectives the origins and develop- ment of American and/or global popular culture. Students will critically analyze the ideas produced by popular culture and mass media in various forms and industries, including but not limited to popular music and video, television, film, theater, visual art, radio, sports, fashion, and advertising, each of which shape our most pow- erful institutions, the social world, and individual lives. A guiding question the course asks is how does popular expression from a variety of cultures and industries shape our understanding of narrative, specifically in the production of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, age, region, and social class? We will focus on what popular culture offers to us that other modes of expression do not and consider the subversive potential of popular forms. Finally, students will learn how to place popular culture within its social, political, economic, and histori- cal contexts. Instructor may focus upon a particular genre within popular culture, or a specific icon.

Prerequisites

ENGL150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Cluster III: Socio-Cultural Diversity

 

Rationale: This course will fulfill requirements in the English BA program. It addresses the force of narrative forms throughout the popu- lar and mass media institutions that shape our contemporary and historical notions of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, social class, re- ligion, and nation. Interdisciplinary and intersectional in method, "Popular Culture: From Blackface to Black Panther" introduces students to contemporary, historical, and intersectional diversity of the human experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geog- raphy, culture, history and language. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differ- ences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

AIV.13

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

African Diaspora Women Writers

Short Description

African Diaspora Women Writers

Catalogue Description

African Diaspora Women Writers focuses on women's writing throughout the global community of the African diaspora. One of the primary questions the course poses is: can we define a tradition or traditions within Afri- can diaspora women's writing, in light of the cultural, national, and linguistic diversity of black women? We will focus on how the recurring motifs, themes, and styles shape the writing of the women of the African diaspora, and we will consider how gender, sexual, religious, ethnic, and social class differences inflect the production of African diaspora women's writing. Finally, this course will consider the varieties of African diaspora women's feminism as a critical approach to combat systemic and institutionalized political inequities.

Prerequisites

ENGL150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Cluster IV: Integrative Knowledge

 

Rationale: This course is being added the current English BA program in order to update the program. Using literature and the anchor disciplines of the Humanities, this course will expand students' knowledge about social or global problems through cross-disciplinary and intersectional analysis. Students will gain a more comprehensive perspective that broadens their understanding of the interrelation- ships between disciplines and enhance their ability to comprehend and contribute to contemporary discourse about the human experi- ence. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and sexual differences via intersectional analysis of texts and global, socio-political events in the context of cross-cultural women's writing.

 

AIV.14

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

Poetry of Place: Voices of Exile

Short Description

Poetry of Place: Voices of Exile

Catalogue Description

This course focuses on works of contemporary poetry that are products or concerns of displacement and mi- gration in the global space. Readings for this course will explore and analyze the historical, cultural and politi- cal influence and impact on modern poetry through the thematic lens of "place." Select readings will explore the ideas of belonging, rejection, exile, immigration/emigration, displacement, and deracination. Students will examine works by poets from diverse countries and places, ranging from Africa, the Americas, Asia and the Caribbean.

Prerequisites

ENGL150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Humanities & Arts

 

Rationale: As part of the B.A.in English, this course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the human experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

AIV.15

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

Ethnographic Playwriting: Stories from the African Diaspora

Short Description

Ethnographic Playwriting: Stories from the African Diaspora

Catalogue Description

Ethnography is a methodology that refers to the study of an individual or a community's customs and cul- tures. Through conducting ethnographic studies, we can encounter our own communities in new ways and come into contact with communities outside of our own. Such study and experience is essential to playwriting as a method to document, critique, and challenge the world in which we live. Through literary review, inter- view-based ethnographic fieldwork in the African Diaspora, and dramatic writing workshops, this course will help students find ways to enter or engage a community, document their individual lives, and document their communities in ethnographic plays. In this course, students will read research-based poetry, drama, fiction, and essays by and about people of African descent in the Diaspora. Students will learn ethnographic research methods and conduct interviews with members of a locally based Diaspora community and write plays based on these interviews. The course will use diverse methods of instruction, including lecture, in-class and online discussion, and group work.

Prerequisites

ENGL150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Cluster IV: Integrative Knowledge

 

Rationale: As part of the B.A. in English, this course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the human experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

Section V: Changes in Existing Courses

 

 

FROM:

TO:

Department(s)

English

Department(s)

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [ ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Academic Level

N/C

Subject Area

ENGL

Subject Area

N/C

Course Prefix & Number

 

ENGL 308

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Title

Discourse Analysis in Contemporary Cultures

Course Title

N/C

Description

Discourse analysis is a linguistic tool that pays close attention to language in use, oral or written, and offers insight into inquiries across the disciplines. The course will examine discourse as a form of social action that has its impact on interpersonal, cultural, and political communications. The aim is to introduce students to major frameworks and current issues in discourse analysis. With knowledge of theoretical and applied discourse analysis, students will be guided through the field of applied linguistics. The course will explore oral and written discourse strategies, power relationships between interlocutors, and cohesion/coherence indica- tors in textual and contextual analysis. This course is open to all students and is designed primarily for English BA and Education majors. This is an ADA-compliant course with complete online and voice accommodation. This course fulfills General Education Requirements described in the LOs section.

Description

N/C

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: ENGL 150 Co-requisites: None

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

Credits

3

Credits

N/C

 

Proposed changes in existing courses in the Department of English AV.1

 

Hours

3

Hours

N/C

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

N/C

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Inten- sive, WAC, etc.)

N/A

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Inten- sive, WAC, etc.)

 

General Education Component

_x     Not Applicable

      Required

      English Composition

      Mathematics

      Science

 

      Flexible

      World Cultures

      US Experience in its Diversity

      Creative Expression

     Individual and Society

General Education Component

College Option

Integrated Knowledge Cluster: Humanities & the Arts

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

 

 

AV.2

 

FROM:

TO:

Department(s)

English

Department(s)

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [ ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Academic Level

N/C

Subject Area

ENGL

Subject Area

N/C

Course Prefix & Number

 

ENGL 361

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Title

Shakespeare

Course Title

Shakespeare Without Borders

Description

This course examines selected Shake- spearean plays within the social, cultural, and political context of the Renaissance. A brief history of the development of the dra- ma and a study of Shakespeare's sources are included in the course.

Description

The course will examine works by Shakespeare and his influences from the Renaissance to the present. Students explore a variety of adapta- tions of Shakespeare's works from a global per- spective and connect his works to the cultural and political context of his literary descendants. Students also study adaptations of multiple gen-

 

 

 

 

res, including novels, film, and music that reinter- pret or reimagine Shakespeare's works, paying close attention to the ways in which those rein- terpretations and adaptations reflect traditions and changes in the historical, social, cultural and political context of the respective environments. Students will examine Shakespeare's works alongside respective adaptations ranging from Africa, the Americas, Asia to the Caribbean.

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: ENGL 150 Co-requisites: None

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

Credits

3

Credits

N/C

Hours

3

Hours

N/C

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

N/C

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Inten- sive, WAC, etc.)

N/A

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Inten- sive, WAC, etc.)

 

General Education Component

_x     Not Applicable

       Required

       English Composition

       Mathematics

       Science

 

       Flexible

       World Cultures

       US Experience in its Diversity

       Creative Expression

      Individual and Society

General Education Component

N/C

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

 

Rationale: As part of the English B.A. program, this course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional di- versity of the human experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in constructive resolu- tions of conflict.

 

AV.3

 

FROM:

 

TO

 

Department(s)

English

Departments

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [  ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Academic Level;

[x] Regular [  ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

 

 

Course Prefix & Number

 

ENGL 325

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Title

Caribbean Literature 1: Beginnings to 1970

Course Title

Caribbean Cosmopolitanism

Description

This course consists of selected read- ings in travel narratives, fiction, poetry, autobiography, and drama from major authors and texts beginning with Euro- pean representations of the colonial en- counter in the Early Modern period and concluding with the literature and literary movements of the independence era.

Description

The course will examine works by Shakespeare and his influences from the Renaissance to the present. Students explore a variety of adaptations of Shake- speare's works from a global perspective and con- nect his works to the cultural and political context of his literary descendants. Students also study adapta- tions of multiple genres, including novels, film, and music that reinterpret or reimagine Shakespeare's works, paying close attention to the ways in which those reinterpretations and adaptations reflect tradi- tions and changes in the historical, social, cultural and political context of the respective environments. Students will examine Shakespeare's works along- side respective adaptations ranging from Africa, the Americas, Asia to the Caribbean. Some other themes may include but are not limited to the issues of "discovery," enslavement, exile, (im)migration, ethnic cleansing, transnationalism, literary and social revolutions.

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: ENGL 150

Co-requisite: None

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

 

Credits

3

Credits

 

Hours

3

Hours

 

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

 

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive,

WAC, etc.)

NA

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing In- tensive, WAC, etc.)

N/C

General Education Component

_x     Not Applicable

         Required

         English Composition

         Mathematics

         Science

 

         Flexible

         World Cultures

         US Experience in its Diversity

         Creative Expression

        Individual and Society

         Scientific World

General Education Component

N/C

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

 

Rationale: As part of the B.A.in English, this course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the human experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, social-class, geography, culture, history and language. Student will also study how this diversity manifests itself in conduct and our interactions with one another. At the completion of the courses in this cluster, students will be better informed decision makers and they will be better able to engage other members of the human family, whether at the individual or group level. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural al differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

 

Proposed changes in Existing Courses in the Department of Public Administration AV.4

FROM:

 

TO

 

Department(s)

Public Administration

Departments

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [  ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Academic Level;

[x] Regular [  ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

 

Subject Area

PA

 

N/C

Course Prefix & Number

PA 300

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Title

Public Bureaucracy

Course Title

Public Bureaucracy and Disaster Management

Description

This course presents students with an overview of organizational and institutional structure on the Public Sector, key decision-makers, politics, and the processes that comprise American Public Bureaucracy will be explored.

Description

This course integrates two distinct but interrelated subject matters - public bureaucracy and disaster management. Disaster management is being used to enlighten students on bureaucratic theo- ries and processes that often appear very difficult for students to learn due to its invisible nature.

Students will gain both a theoretical and practical knowledgebase of bureaucracy through key ex- amples of disaster management.

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: PA 225 Co-requisite: None

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

Frequency

 

Frequency

Every Semester

Students Served

 

Students Served

PA Majors and Minors

Credits

3

Credits

N/C

Hours

3

Hours

N/C

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

N/C

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc.)

NA

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc.)

N/C

General Education Component

_x     Not Applicable

      Required

      English Composition

      Mathematics

      Science

 

      Flexible

      World Cultures

      US Experience in its Diversity

      Creative Expression

     Individual and Society

      Scientific World

General Education Component

N/C

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

 

 

Rationale: The best way for a student to learn about public bureaucracy and bureaucratic culture is through an event that has a lasting impression on government; this is usually in the form of an emergency, crisis, or disaster. Given that bureaucracy can be an invisible subject matter that may appear difficult to explain to students, we sought to integrate a very visible subject matter that demands the us- age of bureaucratic controls and politics in order to either prepare for it, or to mitigate any response or damage.

 

The surge in disasters and worldwide emergencies has soared since 911, Hurricane Katrina, and almost annually since Hurricane Sandy, and this year with the COVID-19 global pandemic. When disasters and emergencies appear, it naturally demands a response that initiates a bureaucratic machinery at all levels of government. It brings into play a response from each level of government that has jurisdiction over the affected areas. Hence, the subject matters of emergency and disaster management cannot be taught without hav- ing in-depth discussions that involves the gist of public bureaucracy. Whether it is a chain of command issue, a jurisdiction issue, or a rules and procedure issue, the theory of bureaucracy must be discussed. As a result, it is fitting that public bureaucracy, a staple in the discipline of public administration become merged with this subject matter to allow for a, much-needed discourse on theories of prepar- edness but also having an ability to respond with minimal disruptions. More importantly, this course will focus on who needs to be called upon to respond and the best methodologies to get them to respond in a "time is of the essence fashion".

 

 

AV.5

 

FROM:

 

TO

 

Department(s)

Public Administration

Departments

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [  ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Academic Level;

[x] Regular [  ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

PA

Subject Area

N/C

Course Prefix & Number

 

PA 395

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Title

Public Administration and Disaster Management

Course Title

Case Studies in Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Management

Description

This course aims at providing a broad under- standing of the strategic role and functions of the public administrative system in the context of disasters. It will examine the bureaucratic ar- rangements of disaster-related agencies and in- stitutions, such as the Federal Emergency Man- agement Agency (FEMA) and the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Response Agency (CDERA), to understand their capacities to rea- sonably predict and aggressively respond to both natural and human-associated disasters. The

Description

This course will provide students with a variety of cases that will educate students all the different phases of emergency preparedness and disaster management. It will analyze in-depth, how to prepare, mitigate, respond, and recover for dif- ferent emergencies and disasters. More im- portantly, students will learn about the different actors, agencies, organizations, and communi- ties, that must come together to make all seg- ments of society whole again.

 

 

course will engage in a comparative study of the more well-known national disaster response agencies in the disaster-prone regions of the world at the same time, will inquire into public administration best practices that have emerged.

 

 

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: PA 300 Co-requisite: None

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

Frequency

N/A

Frequency

Every Semester

Students Served

N/A

Students Served

PA Majors and Minors

Credits

3

Credits

N/C

Hours

3

Hours

N/C

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

N/C

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing In- tensive, WAC, etc.)

NA

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc.)

N/C

General Education Component

_x     Not Applicable

       Required

       English Composition

       Mathematics

       Science

 

       Flexible

       World Cultures

       US Experience in its Diversity

       Creative Expression

      Individual and Society

       Scientific World

General Education Component

N/C

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

 

Rationale: A course, PA 300, was recently re-named Public Bureaucracy and Disaster Management. Hence, PA 300 now serves as the foundation course for educating students about Disaster Management. Thus, PA 395, needs to function as an upper-level course in Disaster Manager. PA 395 is being revised to empower students to assess a variety of real-life emergencies from every perspective.

Students will evaluate a variety of case studies that provide clear, detailed, step-by-step explanations of major disasters or emergencies from around the globe. Topics include natural disasters, industrial accidents, epidemics, pandemics, and terrorist attacks. This course can be used to help prepare first responders, law enforcement, and government and nonprofit employees, for how to be proactive in this new world order.

 

Changes to Existing Courses in the Department of World Languages and Cultures AV.6

FROM:

TO:

Department(s)

World Languages and Cultures

Department(s)

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [ ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Academic Level

N/C

Subject Area

CHIN

Subject Area

N/C

Course Prefix & Number

CHIN 101

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Title

Beginning Chinese I

Course Title

N/C

Description

The course is an introduction to the study of the Chinese (Mandarin) language as a me- dium of communication. It will focus primari- ly on the acquisition of pronunciation and production of fundamental speaking, listen- ing, reading and writing skills. In this basic course, speaking is a priority and will be the foundation for students' further development of their practice in Chinese (Mandarin).

One-hour weekly attendance in the Lan- guage Laboratory is required. The course is not open to native speakers of Chinese or students with prior exposure or acquired proficiency in the language

Description

N/C

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: N/A

Co-requisites: CHIL 101-

Chinese Lab 101

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

Credits

3

Credits

N/C

Hours

3

Hours

N/C

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

N/C

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Inten- sive, WAC, etc.)

N/A

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Inten- sive, WAC, etc.)

N/C

 

General Education Component

_x     Not Applicable Required

English Composition Mathematics Science

 

Flexible

World Cultures

US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Individual and Society

General Education Component

College Option

Socio-Cultural, and Diversity Cluster Integrated Knowledge Cluster: Humanities and the Arts

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

 

 

AV.7

 

FROM:

TO:

Department(s)

World Languages and Cultures

Department(s)

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [ ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Academic Level

N/C

Subject Area

CHIN

Subject Area

N/C

Course Prefix & Number

CHIN 102

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Title

Beginning Chinese II

Course Title

N/C

Description

The course is the continuation of the previ- ous semester of Chinese (Mandarin) as a medium of communication. It will focus pri- marily on the acquisition of pronunciation and production of fundamental speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. In this basic course, speaking is a priority and will be the foundation for students' further de- velopment of their practice in Chinese (Mandarin). One-hour weekly attendance in the Language Laboratory is required. The course is not open to native speakers of Chinese or to students with prior exposure or with general proficiency in the language.

Description

N/C

 

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: N/A Co-requisites:

CHIL 102- Chinese Lab 102

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

Credits

3

Credits

N/C

Hours

3

Hours

N/C

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

N/C

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Inten- sive, WAC, etc.)

N/A

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Inten- sive, WAC, etc.)

N/C

General Education Component

_x     Not Applicable Required

English Composition Mathematics Science

 

Flexible

World Cultures

US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Individual and Society

General Education Component*

College Option

Socio-Cultural, and Diversity Cluster Integrated Knowledge Cluster: Humanities and the Arts

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

 

 

Section VI: Courses Withdrawn NONE

 

Section VII: Affiliation Agreements NONE

 

 

 

Medgar Evers College

Academic University Report Detail November/December 2020

PART A: ACADEMIC MATTERS

 

Section AII: Special Actions NONE

 

Section II: Changes in Generic Degree Requirements NONE

 

Section III: Changes in Degree Programs

 

AIII.1 The following revisions are proposed for the BS in Public Administration Program: BS in Public Administration

Program Codes: 2102 (HEGIS)

Effective: Fall 2020

 

Description: The addition of PA 300 to the Department Core; the Removal of PA 395 from Department Core and the addition of PA 395 to all PA Degree Concentrations - Criminal Justice, Law and Public Policy, International Administration, Comparative Administration, Community Development, and General Concentration

 

From

From

Course                                                                                          Credits

Course                                                                                            Credits

BS - Public Administration Major Requirements

ACCT 217       Principles of Accounting                        3

CIS 101           Computer Fundamentals                        3

CIS 211           Internet and Emerging Technology                        3

ECON 212      Macroeconomics                        3

FS 101            Freshman Seminar 101                        3

LAW 208         The Legal Environment of Business                        3

LIB 100            Library and Research Methods                        2

MTH 213         Introduction to Statistics                        3

PA 103            Introduction to Public Service and Administration 3 PA 150                        Introduction to Criminal Law                        3

Or

PA 260            Constitutional Law                        3

PA 200            Introduction to Nonprofit Administration                        3

Or

PA 215            Designing Local Programs                        3

PA 205            Public Personnel                        3

PA 211            NYS and Local Government                        3

PA 225            Introduction to Public Policy                        3

PA 285            International Administration                        3

Department of Public Administration Proposed Department Core- BS Degree

CIS 101           Computer Fundamentals                          3

CIS 211           Internet and Emerging Technology           3

FS 101            Freshman Seminar I                                 1

FS 102            Freshman Seminar II                                1

LIB 100            Library and Research Methods                 2

MTH 213         Introduction to Statistics                            3

PA 103            Introduction to Public Service and Administration 3 PA 150       Introduction to Criminal Law

Or

PA 260            Constitutional Law                                    3

PA 200            Introduction to Nonprofit Administration   3

Or

PA 215            Designing Local Programs                       3

PA 205            Public Personnel                                       3

PA 211            NYS and Local Government                     3

PA 214            Organization Theory

PA 225            Public Policy and Caseload Management                        3

PA 285            Administration of Global Institutions         3

 

PA 290            Internship I                              3

PA 325            Fiscal Administration                3

PA 326            Ethics in Government             3

PA 390            Research Methods and Statistics          3

PA 395            Public Administration and Disaster Management                                     3

PA 407            Comparative Public Administration 3

OR

PA 486            Global Public Policy                3

PA 490            Internship (Capstone Course) 3

PAXXX            Elective                                    3

 

 

 

Concentration -12 Credits:

Choose One from the List Below

Law Pathways/Criminal Justice Administration:

required for students pursuing careers in law enforcement PA 150- Introduction to Criminal Law

PA 235- Criminal Justice and Its Processes PA 250 - Parole and Probation

PA 275 -Community Policing

PA 365 -Crime and Punishment in Urban America PA 440 -Judicial Processes and Court Systems

 

International Administration

PA 395 - Public Administration and Disaster Management PA 407 - Comparative Administration

PA 450 -Decision Making

PA 480 -Globalization and Public Administration

PA 485 -Seminar: International Administration and Diplomacy PA 486 -Global Public Policy

PA 290            Internship I

PA 300*           Public Bureaucracy and Disaster Management   3 PA 325                        Fiscal Administration                        3

PA 326            Ethics in Government                        3

PA 390            Research Methods and Statistics                        3

PA 407            Comparative Public Administration                        3

OR

PA 486            Global Public Policy                        3

PA 413            Program Evaluation                        3

PA 450            Decision-making in Government (Capstone)      3

PA 490            Internship II                        3

Electives                                                                                               12

Grand Total                                                                                               78

 

Concentration- 12 Credits:

Choose One Concentration from the List Below Law Pathways/Criminal Justice Administration:

required for students pursuing careers in Law Enforcement PA 235 -Criminal Justice and Its Processes

PA 250 -Parole and Probation PA 275 - Community Policing PA 311-GIS Applications

PA 365 -Crime and Punishment in Urban America (If Not Taken as Part of the College Option)

PA 395* - Cases Studies in Emergency and Disaster Management PA 415 - Policymaking and the Public Interest

PA 440 -Judicial Processes and Court Systems

 

International Administration

ACCT 217 -Principles of Accounting

LAW 208 -Legal Environment of Business

PA 395* - Cases Studies in Emergency and Disaster Management PA 407 -Comparative Administration

(lf Not Taken in Department Core) PA 415 -Policymaking and the Public Interest ECON 430/PA 430 -War on Drugs

PA 480 -Globalization and Public Administration

PA 485 - Seminar: International Administration and Diplomacy PA-486 - Global Public Policy (If not taken in Department Core)

 

 

Non-Profit Administration

PA 330- Public Policy, Advocacy, and Services for the Aged

PA 335 -Principles of Philanthropy, Fundraising, and Development PA 340 -Strategic Planning, Budgeting, and Project Management PA 395 -Public Administration and Disaster Management

PA 450 -Decision Making

PA 410 -Administrative Rules and Regulations PA 413 -Public Program Evaluation

 

 

Public Policy

PA 3XX- Blacks in Government PA 30I - Education Policy

PA 315 -Case Studies in Public Policy

PA 330 - Public Policy, Advocacy, and Services for the Aged PA 405 -NYC Administration

PA 410 -Administrative Rules and Regulations PA 413 - Public Program Evaluation

PA 415 - Policymaking and the Public Interest ECON 430/PA 430 -War on Drugs

PA 450 -Decision Making PA 486 -Global Public Policy

 

 

Community Development/Urban Administration PA 3XX- Blacks in Government

PA 325 -Fiscal Administration

PA 340 - Strategic Planning, Budgeting, and Project Management PA 350 -Theories of Urban Administration

PA 365 -Crime and Punishment in Urban America

PA 395 -Public Administration and Disaster Management PA 405 -NYC Administration

PA 410 -Administrative Rules and Regulations PA 413 -Public Program Evaluation

PA 450 -Decision Making

Non-Profit Administration

ACCT 217 -Principals of Accounting

LAW 208 -Legal Environment of Business PA 301 - Education Policy

PA 330 - Public Policy, Advocacy, and Services for the Aged

PA 335 -Principles of Philanthropy, Fundraising, and Development PA 340 -Strategic Planning, Budgeting, and Project Management PA 395* - Case Studies in Emergency and Disaster Management PA 410 -Administrative Rules and Regulations

PA 415 -Policymaking and the Public Interest

 

Law and Public Policy

ACCT 217 -Principals of Accounting

LAW 208 - Legal Environment of Business PA 3XX- Blacks in Government

PA 301 -Education Policy PA 311 -GIS Applications

PA 315 -Case Studies in Public Policy

PA 330 -Public Policy, Advocacy, and Services for the Aged

PA 395* - Cases Studies in Emergency and Disaster Management PA 405 -NYC Administration

PA 410 -Administrative Rules and Regulations PA 415 -Policymaking and the Public Interest ECON 430/PA 430 -War on Drugs

PA 486 -Global Public Policy (If Not taken in Department Core)

 

Community Development

ACCT 217 - Principals of Accounting LAW 208 -Legal Environment of Business PA 3XX- Blacks in Government

PA 311 -GIS Applications

PA 340 - Strategic Planning, Budgeting, and Project Management PA 350- Theories of Urban Administration

PA 365 -Crime and Punishment in Urban America (If Not Taken as Part of the College Option)

PA 395* - Cases Studies in Emergency and Disaster Management PA 405 -NYC Administration

PA 410 -Administrative Rules and Regulations PA 415 -Policymaking and the Public Interest

 

 

 

General Concentration

ACCT 208 - Principals of Accounting

LAW 208 - Legal Environment of Business PA 235 - Criminal Justice and Its Processes PA 250 - Parole and Probation

PA 275 - Community Policing PA 3XX - Blacks in Government PA 311 - GIS Applications

PA 315 - Case Studies in Public Policy

PA 330 - Public Policy, Advocacy, and Services for the Aged

PA 335-Principles of Philanthropy, Fundraising, and Development PA 340 - Strategic Planning, Budgeting, and Project Management PA 350 - Theories of Urban Administration

PA 365 - Crime and Punishment in Urban America (If Not Taken as Part of the College Option)

PA 395* - Cases Studies in Emergency and Disaster Management PA 405 - NYC Administration

PA 407 - Comparative Administration

(If Not Taken in Department Core}

PA 410 - Administrative Rules and Regulations PA 415 - Policymaking and the Public Interest ECON 430/PA 430 -War on Drugs

(If Not Taken as Part of the College Option) PA 440 - Judicial Processes and Court Systems PA 480 - Globalization and Public Administration

PA 485 - Seminar: International Administration and Diplomacy PA 486 - Global Public Policy (If Not taken in Department Core)

 

 

ENGL 112

Composition I

3

ENOL 150

College Composition II

3

BIO 101

Introduction to the Science of Biology

3

PHS 101

Introduction to Physical Science

3

MTH 136

Algebra and Trigonometry

3

ENGL 212

World Literature: The Evolving Canon

3

ART 100

Introduction to World Art

3

Or

MUS 100

 

Introduction to World Music

 

3

HlST 200

Growth and Development of the US

3

ECON 212

Principles of Macroeconomics

3

SSC 101

Culture, Society, and Change

3

Or

SOC 101

 

Introduction to Sociology

 

3

BIO 211

Biotechnology and Society

3

Total

 

30

 

College Option (12 Credits)

Foreign Language I/Foreign Language II

 

 

6

One Socio-Cultural

3

One Integrative Knowledge

3

Total

12

Grand Total

42

 

 

 

 

General Education Requirements

Rationale: PA 300 was originally a part of the Department Core but was removed and subsequently became a hidden pre-requisite for all upper level PA courses. It is now being re-designed and renamed and can once again serve as the pre-requisite to all upper-level PA courses, which already has PA 300 as a pre-requisite. Hence, there will no longer be a hidden pre-requisite for upper-level PA courses. Also, PA 395, which is currently a part of the Department Core, will be moved to all of the PA BS Concentrations.

 

Department(s)

Social and Behavioral Science

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

AWS

Course Number

101

Course Title

Introduction to Africana World Studies

Short Description

Introduction to Africana World Studies

Catalogue Description

This introductory survey course introduces students to Africana World Studies as a field of study from diverse disciplinary perspectives, including the humanities, social sciences, and the arts through an overview of the socio-economic, historical, psychological, political and cultural experiences of African peoples on the continent of Africa and throughout the Diaspora. Particular attention is given to the physical, cultural and intellectual movements as well as on the role of race, class, and gender in assessing similarities and differences in expe- riences throughout the broader Africana World. Further, the course is designed to give students a concise un- derstanding of the heritage of African people and a framework to analyze the culture and institutional interac- tions which both shaped the African Diaspora and was shaped by people of African descent

Prerequisites

None

Co-requisites

ENGL 112

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

  X     Not Applicable

 

Section IV: New Courses AIV.1

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rationale. This introductory survey course is necessary to provide foundational content for the discipline. In addition to highlighting the relevance of the field to contemporary study, it grounds students in key theories and methodologies that are necessary for advanced study in Africana World Studies through an inter-disciplinary and transnational lens.

 

AIV.2

Department(s)

Social and Behavioral Science

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

AWS

Course Number

300

Course Title

Women in Africa and the African Diaspora

Short Description

Women in Africa and the African Diaspora

Catalogue Description

Women in continental Africa and throughout the African Diaspora from the earliest times to the present

are examined. Focus is placed on the dispersal, growth and influence of women of African descent throughout various localities of the world. Emphasis includes commonalities as well as differences in regional experiences within the Diaspora. Various primary and secondary sources are utilized to assess the historical, socio- economic, cultural, and religious roles, positions, and experiences of women within an interdisciplinary context.

Prerequisites

One of the following: HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 200, HIST 201, HIST 208, ANTH 200, ANTH 201, AWS 101,

POL 101, SOC 101, SSC 101; and ENGL 150

ANTH 201, AWS 101, POL 101, SOC 101, SSC 101;

and

ENGL 150

One of the following: HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 200, HIST 201, HIST 208, ANTH 200, ANTH 201, AWS 101,

POL 101, SOC 101, SSC 101;

and

ENGL 150

One of the following: HIST 101, HIST 102, HIST 200, HIST 201, HIST 208, ANTH 200, ANTH 201, AWS 101,

POL 101, SOC 101, SSC 101;

and

ENGL 150

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

 X Not Applicable

Rationale.This course will be an added elective to the BA in Liberal Studies degree program and a core requirement in a proposed new degree program. Having a fundamental understanding of the position of women of African descent in a global context is critical to un- derstanding the dynamics that continue their interactions, advancement, and challenges.

 

AIV.3

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

Resistance and Reformation in Early African American Literature

Short Description

Resistance and Reformation in Early African American Literature

Catalogue Description

This course examines the ways in which early African American texts represent a tradition of resistance and reformation and contribute to an understanding of political, philosophical and religious beliefs and ideals in early African American literature. Students will examine oratory, letters, essays, slave narratives, poems, au- tobiographies, and fiction from the Atlantic Slave Trade to 1910. Readings include Olaudah Equiano, Phillis Wheatley, David Walker, Frederick Douglass, Frances E. Harper, Sojourner Truth, Harriet Jacobs, Martin Delany, William Wells Brown, and Ida B Wells-Barnett.

Prerequisites

ENGL 150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Socio-Cultural, and Diversity Cluster

 

Rationale. As part of the English BA, this course will focus on the themes of resistance and activism in early African American Litera- ture. It will introduce students to the historical, political and sociological diversity of the African American experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language.

 

AIV.4

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

The Harlem Renaissance: At Home in the World

Short Description

The Harlem Renaissance: At Home in the World

Catalogue Description

This course reads the Harlem Renaissance through the lens of the African diaspora with a focus on interna- tionalism. Although geographically located in Harlem, NYC, the literary work of the period is preoccupied with global spaces beyond the United States. Many Harlem Renaissance texts include key dramatic scenes in other countries, and some are staged completely outside of Harlem. Therefore, we will analyze the particular aesthetic codes the Harlem Renaissance produces and learn about the debates that shape this unique liter- ary arts movement at "home" in Harlem, and abroad. What do we learn from the anxious encounters of peo- ples of African descent in Harlem Renaissance life and literature? We will pay special attention to under- standing Harlem Renaissance literature through the lens of queer identities that trouble prescribed sexual and gender roles in Harlem Renaissance literature and life.

Prerequisites

ENGL 211 or ENGL 212

Co-requisites

N/A

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Frequency:

Every three semesters

Anticipated Enrollment

Spring Semester

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Socio-Cultural and Diversity Cluster

Rationale: As part of the English B.A program, and using literature and the anchor disciplines of the Humanities, this course will ex- pand students' knowledge about social or global problems through cross-disciplinary analysis. Students will gain a more comprehen- sive perspective that broadens their understanding of the interrelationships between disciplines and enhance their ability to compre- hend and contribute to contemporary discourse about the human experience. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and sexual differences via intersectional analysis of texts, and global, socio-political events in the context of the Harlem Renaissance.

13

 

AIV.5

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

Transforming American Literature: U.S. Latina/o/x Texts

Short Description

Transforming American Literature: U.S. Latina/o/x Texts

Catalogue Description

U.S. Latina/o/x literature bears a distinct force in American letters, and its impression upon our national identity transforms the American "grand narrative". This course will explore how different forms of Latina/o/x literature produce new social, political, and aesthetic knowledge in American arts and letters, identity, and culture. Liter- ary voices will be drawn from Puerto Rican, Mexican, Dominican, Cuban, and other Latin American migrations to the US, as we investigate how U.S. Latina/o/x experiences of resistance and assimilation, exile, identity formation, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality shape the American social world. What new aesthetic forms are created by US Latina/o/x literature and culture, and how do such forms transform American literature and culture? Forms include poetry, autobiography, novel, film, and music. Other themes may include border and hybrid identity, (im)migration, bilingualism, political presence, mestizaje, and indigeneity.

Prerequisites

ENGL 150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Socio-Cultural and Diversity Cluster III

 

Rationale:

As part of the English B.A. program, and using literature and the anchor disciplines of the Humanities, this course will expand stu- dents' knowledge about social or global problems through cross-disciplinary analysis. Students will gain a more comprehensive per- spective that broadens their understanding of the interrelationships between disciplines and enhance their ability to comprehend and contribute to contemporary discourse about the human experience. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreci- ate gender and sexual differences via intersectional analysis of texts and global, socio-political events in the U.S Latina/o/x context.

 

AIV.6

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

Slavery, Emancipation, and Empire in British Literature

Short Description

Slavery, Emancipation, and Empire in British Literature

Catalogue Description

This course studies the literature by and about Africans in Britain during slavery, emancipation, and empire with a particular focus on the 18th and 19th centuries, and examines the literary, political, and legal resistance to slavery. The course looks at the diverse experiences - in terms of gender, legal status, location and occu- pation of Africans living in Britain during the period. Focused mostly on Black British writers and on African diaspora authors whose works were influential in the British context, the course also addresses representa- tions of Africans in British literature and culture during the period.

Prerequisites

ENGL 211 or ENGL 212

Co-requisities

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Socio-Cultural and Diversity Cluster III

 

Rationale:

This course will fulfill requirements for the BA in English. It is a more current formulation of British literature for students in the English programs. This course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the human experience in var- ious contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better abil- ity to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

AIV.7

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

Windrush to Brexit and Beyond: "Race" and Nation in Contemporary British Literature

Short Description

Windrush to Brexit and Beyond: "Race" and Nation in Contemporary British Literature

Catalogue Description

This course will focus on literature by contemporary authors of Black British, Asian, and Minority Ethnic (BAME) backgrounds. It will examine texts from a range of genres in terms of their artistic innovations, their thematic concerns, and their relationship to broader cultural and social contexts. The historic arc begins after the Second World War with the arrival of Windrush Generation migrants from the Caribbean and continues with migrant, refugee, and British-born BAME writing to the present day. The course will examine changing constructs of "Blackness" and British national identity throughout the period and their literary manifestations. In addition to "race" and ethnicity, the course will address other areas of difference and the intersecting cultural projects emerging throughout the period with Black feminist, LGBTQ, and other movements that have urged an inclusive vision of nation. The course will also examine opposing cultural discourses culminating in the Brexit decision to withdraw from the European Union.

Prerequisites

ENGL 211 or ENGL 212

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

Socio-Cultural and Diversity Cluster III

 

Rationale.

This course will fulfill requirements for the BA in English. It is a more current formulation of contemporary British Literature for students in the English programs. This course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the human ex- perience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Specifically, students will demon- strate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

AIV.8

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

Afro-European Literature and Culture Today

Short Description

Afro-European Literature and Culture Today

Catalogue Description

This interdisciplinary course focuses on the literary and cultural responses to questions of identity and belong- ing that people of African descent living in Europe experience today. Artistic production will be examined in terms of aesthetic innovation, historical colonial relationships, and current social, political, and economic de- bates surrounding migration, citizenship rights, and inequality. The course will examine the literature and cul- ture of those claiming an identity that is both African and European, as well as address intersections with class, gender, sexuality, religion, and other areas of difference. In examining contemporary Afro-European transna- tional culture in a range of countries in Europe, the course will draw upon literature, film, figurative arts, and music, as well as on current sociological, political, and legal writings.

Prerequisites

ENGL 150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Cluster IV: Integrative Knowledge

 

Rationale: This course will be a major elective for students in the BA of Liberal Studies degree and will be a major elective for other de- grees currently in development (BA/BS of Sociology, BA/BS of Geography). Population geographers work in fields related to demo- graphic analysis, in industries including federal, state, and municipal government, market research, and public health. The Bureau of Labor Statistics' Occupational Outlook Handbook identifies job titles including demographer, epidemiologist, survey researcher, regional planner, which the handbook ranks as having 'above average' job growth. Students in this course will gain industry relevant skills for analyzing demographic data and applying demographic tools.

 

AIV.9

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

Caribbean Spirits, Postcolonial Specters

Short Description

Caribbean Spirits, Postcolonial Specters

Catalogue Description

This course examines the preoccupation with the ghost, the specter, and hauntings in Caribbean literature. Students will sharpen critical thinking, reading, and writing skills by analyzing the ways Caribbean literature confronts historical and contemporary issues of enslavement, colonialism, national/linguistic difference, ethnic cleansing, and migration through the specter, the ghost, and historical hauntings. Caribbean writers reimagine the past through the use of spirits and specters. Certain guiding questions this course asks may include: what haunts the Caribbean, and what sorts of work do ghosts, specters, and/or the dead enact in literature from the archipelago? Why are we drawn to ghosts; what sorts of knowledge do spectral and otherworldly encounters in Caribbean literature offer us? Some other themes include visual technologies versus minor narratives, transnationalism, gender and sexual difference.

Prerequisites

ENGL 211 or ENGL 212

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Socio-Cultural and Diversity Cluster III

 

Rationale: As part of the B.A.in English, this course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the human experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Student will also study how this diversity manifests itself in conduct and our interactions with one another. At the completion of this course, students will be bet- ter informed decision makers and be better able to engage other members of the human family, whether at the individual or group level. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in con- structive resolutions of conflict.

 

AIV.10

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

World on the Move: 20th and 21st Century Global Literature

Short Description

World on the Move: 20th and 21st Century Global Literature

Catalogue Description

This course focuses on the literary responses to 20th and 21st century experiences of political repression, war, genocide, and other human rights violations, as well as on environmental factors and globalization, that result in global migrations, diasporas, and an ever-growing number of refugees and asylum-seekers worldwide - of- ten referred to as a "World on the Move." Artistic production will be examined in terms of both aesthetic innova- tion and the socio-economic and political contexts causing global migrations. The course will focus on the Afri- can diaspora and on the diasporas of at least two other groups of people in different areas of the globe. The course will examine issues of "race," ethnicity, gender, sexuality, and religion in relation to forced migration and diaspora through a range of literary genres and other cultural representations.

Prerequisites

ENGL150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Cluster III: Socio-Cultural Diversity

 

Rationale: This course will fulfill requirements for the BA in English; it will also fulfill the Cluster III: Socio-Cultural Diversity requirement in the College Option. This course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the human expe- rience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

AIV.11

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

Global Feminisms: Writing Gender and Sexuality

Short Description

Global Feminisms: Writing Gender and Sexuality

Catalogue Description

This course introduces students to historical and contemporary debates in feminism and gender/sexuality studies. Global Feminisms analyzes the produ ction of gender and sexual difference articulated with race, ethnicity, class, religion, and nation within and across a variety of historical and cultural contexts and through- out diverse textual and multimedia examples. A guiding question of the course asks: what is the difference be- tween gender and sexual identity? We will focus on how such differences reflect the shaping of social roles in Western and non-Western societies. Another focus includes the issue of "normative" constructions of gender and sexuality and how they shape and affect human behavior. This course uses a variety of literary, theoreti- cal, and feminist approaches.

Prerequisites

ENGL150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Cluster IV: Integrative Knowledge

 

Rationale: As part of the B.A.in English, and using literature and the anchor disciplines of the Humanities, this course will expand stu- dents' knowledge about social or global problems of gender and sexual difference in various global, historical, and contemporary con- texts through cross and interdisciplinary analysis. Students will gain a more comprehensive perspective that broadens their understand- ing of the interrelationships between disciplines and enhance their ability to comprehend and contribute to contemporary discourse about the human experience. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and sexual differences via in- tersectional analysis of texts and socio-political events in the context of global feminisms.

 

AIV.12

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

Popular Culture: From Blackface to Black Panther

Short Description

Popular Culture: From Blackface to Black Panther

Catalogue Description

In this course on popular culture, students will assess from a variety of perspectives the origins and develop- ment of American and/or global popular culture. Students will critically analyze the ideas produced by popular culture and mass media in various forms and industries, including but not limited to popular music and video, television, film, theater, visual art, radio, sports, fashion, and advertising, each of which shape our most pow- erful institutions, the social world, and individual lives. A guiding question the course asks is how does popular expression from a variety of cultures and industries shape our understanding of narrative, specifically in the production of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, age, region, and social class? We will focus on what popular culture offers to us that other modes of expression do not and consider the subversive potential of popular forms. Finally, students will learn how to place popular culture within its social, political, economic, and histori- cal contexts. Instructor may focus upon a particular genre within popular culture, or a specific icon.

Prerequisites

ENGL150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Cluster III: Socio-Cultural Diversity

 

Rationale: This course will fulfill requirements in the English BA program. It addresses the force of narrative forms throughout the popu- lar and mass media institutions that shape our contemporary and historical notions of gender, sexuality, race, ethnicity, social class, re- ligion, and nation. Interdisciplinary and intersectional in method, "Popular Culture: From Blackface to Black Panther" introduces students to contemporary, historical, and intersectional diversity of the human experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geog- raphy, culture, history and language. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differ- ences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

AIV.13

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

African Diaspora Women Writers

Short Description

African Diaspora Women Writers

Catalogue Description

African Diaspora Women Writers focuses on women's writing throughout the global community of the African diaspora. One of the primary questions the course poses is: can we define a tradition or traditions within Afri- can diaspora women's writing, in light of the cultural, national, and linguistic diversity of black women? We will focus on how the recurring motifs, themes, and styles shape the writing of the women of the African diaspora, and we will consider how gender, sexual, religious, ethnic, and social class differences inflect the production of African diaspora women's writing. Finally, this course will consider the varieties of African diaspora women's feminism as a critical approach to combat systemic and institutionalized political inequities.

Prerequisites

ENGL150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Cluster IV: Integrative Knowledge

 

Rationale: This course is being added the current English BA program in order to update the program. Using literature and the anchor disciplines of the Humanities, this course will expand students' knowledge about social or global problems through cross-disciplinary and intersectional analysis. Students will gain a more comprehensive perspective that broadens their understanding of the interrelation- ships between disciplines and enhance their ability to comprehend and contribute to contemporary discourse about the human experi- ence. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and sexual differences via intersectional analysis of texts and global, socio-political events in the context of cross-cultural women's writing.

 

AIV.14

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

Poetry of Place: Voices of Exile

Short Description

Poetry of Place: Voices of Exile

Catalogue Description

This course focuses on works of contemporary poetry that are products or concerns of displacement and mi- gration in the global space. Readings for this course will explore and analyze the historical, cultural and politi- cal influence and impact on modern poetry through the thematic lens of "place." Select readings will explore the ideas of belonging, rejection, exile, immigration/emigration, displacement, and deracination. Students will examine works by poets from diverse countries and places, ranging from Africa, the Americas, Asia and the Caribbean.

Prerequisites

ENGL150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Humanities & Arts

 

Rationale: As part of the B.A.in English, this course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the human experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

AIV.15

 

Department(s)

English

Career

[ x ] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Academic Level

[ x ] Regular [  ] Compensatory [  ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

Course Number

3XX

Course Title

Ethnographic Playwriting: Stories from the African Diaspora

Short Description

Ethnographic Playwriting: Stories from the African Diaspora

Catalogue Description

Ethnography is a methodology that refers to the study of an individual or a community's customs and cul- tures. Through conducting ethnographic studies, we can encounter our own communities in new ways and come into contact with communities outside of our own. Such study and experience is essential to playwriting as a method to document, critique, and challenge the world in which we live. Through literary review, inter- view-based ethnographic fieldwork in the African Diaspora, and dramatic writing workshops, this course will help students find ways to enter or engage a community, document their individual lives, and document their communities in ethnographic plays. In this course, students will read research-based poetry, drama, fiction, and essays by and about people of African descent in the Diaspora. Students will learn ethnographic research methods and conduct interviews with members of a locally based Diaspora community and write plays based on these interviews. The course will use diverse methods of instruction, including lecture, in-class and online discussion, and group work.

Prerequisites

ENGL150

Co-requisites

None

Credits

3

Contact Hours

3

Liberal Arts

[ X ] Yes

Course Attribute

 

General Education Component

College Option: Cluster IV: Integrative Knowledge

 

Rationale: As part of the B.A. in English, this course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the human experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

Section V: Changes in Existing Courses

 

 

FROM:

TO:

Department(s)

English

Department(s)

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [ ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Academic Level

N/C

Subject Area

ENGL

Subject Area

N/C

Course Prefix & Number

 

ENGL 308

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Title

Discourse Analysis in Contemporary Cultures

Course Title

N/C

Description

Discourse analysis is a linguistic tool that pays close attention to language in use, oral or written, and offers insight into inquiries across the disciplines. The course will examine discourse as a form of social action that has its impact on interpersonal, cultural, and political communications. The aim is to introduce students to major frameworks and current issues in discourse analysis. With knowledge of theoretical and applied discourse analysis, students will be guided through the field of applied linguistics. The course will explore oral and written discourse strategies, power relationships between interlocutors, and cohesion/coherence indica- tors in textual and contextual analysis. This course is open to all students and is designed primarily for English BA and Education majors. This is an ADA-compliant course with complete online and voice accommodation. This course fulfills General Education Requirements described in the LOs section.

Description

N/C

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: ENGL 150 Co-requisites: None

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

Credits

3

Credits

N/C

 

Proposed changes in existing courses in the Department of English AV.1

 

Hours

3

Hours

N/C

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

N/C

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Inten- sive, WAC, etc.)

N/A

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Inten- sive, WAC, etc.)

 

General Education Component

_x     Not Applicable

      Required

      English Composition

      Mathematics

      Science

 

      Flexible

      World Cultures

      US Experience in its Diversity

      Creative Expression

     Individual and Society

General Education Component

College Option

Integrated Knowledge Cluster: Humanities & the Arts

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

 

 

AV.2

 

FROM:

TO:

Department(s)

English

Department(s)

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [ ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Academic Level

N/C

Subject Area

ENGL

Subject Area

N/C

Course Prefix & Number

 

ENGL 361

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Title

Shakespeare

Course Title

Shakespeare Without Borders

Description

This course examines selected Shake- spearean plays within the social, cultural, and political context of the Renaissance. A brief history of the development of the dra- ma and a study of Shakespeare's sources are included in the course.

Description

The course will examine works by Shakespeare and his influences from the Renaissance to the present. Students explore a variety of adapta- tions of Shakespeare's works from a global per- spective and connect his works to the cultural and political context of his literary descendants. Students also study adaptations of multiple gen-

 

 

 

 

res, including novels, film, and music that reinter- pret or reimagine Shakespeare's works, paying close attention to the ways in which those rein- terpretations and adaptations reflect traditions and changes in the historical, social, cultural and political context of the respective environments. Students will examine Shakespeare's works alongside respective adaptations ranging from Africa, the Americas, Asia to the Caribbean.

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: ENGL 150 Co-requisites: None

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

Credits

3

Credits

N/C

Hours

3

Hours

N/C

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

N/C

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Inten- sive, WAC, etc.)

N/A

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Inten- sive, WAC, etc.)

 

General Education Component

_x     Not Applicable

       Required

       English Composition

       Mathematics

       Science

 

       Flexible

       World Cultures

       US Experience in its Diversity

       Creative Expression

      Individual and Society

General Education Component

N/C

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

 

Rationale: As part of the English B.A. program, this course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional di- versity of the human experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, geography, culture, history and language. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural differences and to engage others in constructive resolu- tions of conflict.

 

AV.3

 

FROM:

 

TO

 

Department(s)

English

Departments

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [  ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Academic Level;

[x] Regular [  ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

ENGL

 

 

Course Prefix & Number

 

ENGL 325

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Title

Caribbean Literature 1: Beginnings to 1970

Course Title

Caribbean Cosmopolitanism

Description

This course consists of selected read- ings in travel narratives, fiction, poetry, autobiography, and drama from major authors and texts beginning with Euro- pean representations of the colonial en- counter in the Early Modern period and concluding with the literature and literary movements of the independence era.

Description

The course will examine works by Shakespeare and his influences from the Renaissance to the present. Students explore a variety of adaptations of Shake- speare's works from a global perspective and con- nect his works to the cultural and political context of his literary descendants. Students also study adapta- tions of multiple genres, including novels, film, and music that reinterpret or reimagine Shakespeare's works, paying close attention to the ways in which those reinterpretations and adaptations reflect tradi- tions and changes in the historical, social, cultural and political context of the respective environments. Students will examine Shakespeare's works along- side respective adaptations ranging from Africa, the Americas, Asia to the Caribbean. Some other themes may include but are not limited to the issues of "discovery," enslavement, exile, (im)migration, ethnic cleansing, transnationalism, literary and social revolutions.

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: ENGL 150

Co-requisite: None

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

 

Credits

3

Credits

 

Hours

3

Hours

 

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

 

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive,

WAC, etc.)

NA

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing In- tensive, WAC, etc.)

N/C

General Education Component

_x     Not Applicable

         Required

         English Composition

         Mathematics

         Science

 

         Flexible

         World Cultures

         US Experience in its Diversity

         Creative Expression

        Individual and Society

         Scientific World

General Education Component

N/C

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

 

Rationale: As part of the B.A.in English, this course will introduce students to the contemporary, historical and intersectional diversity of the human experience in various contexts, including gender, ethnicity, social-class, geography, culture, history and language. Student will also study how this diversity manifests itself in conduct and our interactions with one another. At the completion of the courses in this cluster, students will be better informed decision makers and they will be better able to engage other members of the human family, whether at the individual or group level. Specifically, students will demonstrate a better ability to appreciate gender and intercultural al differences and to engage others in constructive resolutions of conflict.

 

 

Proposed changes in Existing Courses in the Department of Public Administration AV.4

FROM:

 

TO

 

Department(s)

Public Administration

Departments

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [  ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Academic Level;

[x] Regular [  ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

 

Subject Area

PA

 

N/C

Course Prefix & Number

PA 300

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Title

Public Bureaucracy

Course Title

Public Bureaucracy and Disaster Management

Description

This course presents students with an overview of organizational and institutional structure on the Public Sector, key decision-makers, politics, and the processes that comprise American Public Bureaucracy will be explored.

Description

This course integrates two distinct but interrelated subject matters - public bureaucracy and disaster management. Disaster management is being used to enlighten students on bureaucratic theo- ries and processes that often appear very difficult for students to learn due to its invisible nature.

Students will gain both a theoretical and practical knowledgebase of bureaucracy through key ex- amples of disaster management.

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: PA 225 Co-requisite: None

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

Frequency

 

Frequency

Every Semester

Students Served

 

Students Served

PA Majors and Minors

Credits

3

Credits

N/C

Hours

3

Hours

N/C

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

N/C

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc.)

NA

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc.)

N/C

General Education Component

_x     Not Applicable

      Required

      English Composition

      Mathematics

      Science

 

      Flexible

      World Cultures

      US Experience in its Diversity

      Creative Expression

     Individual and Society

      Scientific World

General Education Component

N/C

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

 

 

Rationale: The best way for a student to learn about public bureaucracy and bureaucratic culture is through an event that has a lasting impression on government; this is usually in the form of an emergency, crisis, or disaster. Given that bureaucracy can be an invisible subject matter that may appear difficult to explain to students, we sought to integrate a very visible subject matter that demands the us- age of bureaucratic controls and politics in order to either prepare for it, or to mitigate any response or damage.

 

The surge in disasters and worldwide emergencies has soared since 911, Hurricane Katrina, and almost annually since Hurricane Sandy, and this year with the COVID-19 global pandemic. When disasters and emergencies appear, it naturally demands a response that initiates a bureaucratic machinery at all levels of government. It brings into play a response from each level of government that has jurisdiction over the affected areas. Hence, the subject matters of emergency and disaster management cannot be taught without hav- ing in-depth discussions that involves the gist of public bureaucracy. Whether it is a chain of command issue, a jurisdiction issue, or a rules and procedure issue, the theory of bureaucracy must be discussed. As a result, it is fitting that public bureaucracy, a staple in the discipline of public administration become merged with this subject matter to allow for a, much-needed discourse on theories of prepar- edness but also having an ability to respond with minimal disruptions. More importantly, this course will focus on who needs to be called upon to respond and the best methodologies to get them to respond in a "time is of the essence fashion".

 

 

AV.5

 

FROM:

 

TO

 

Department(s)

Public Administration

Departments

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [  ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Academic Level;

[x] Regular [  ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [  ] Remedial

Subject Area

PA

Subject Area

N/C

Course Prefix & Number

 

PA 395

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Title

Public Administration and Disaster Management

Course Title

Case Studies in Emergency Preparedness and Disaster Management

Description

This course aims at providing a broad under- standing of the strategic role and functions of the public administrative system in the context of disasters. It will examine the bureaucratic ar- rangements of disaster-related agencies and in- stitutions, such as the Federal Emergency Man- agement Agency (FEMA) and the Caribbean Disaster Emergency Response Agency (CDERA), to understand their capacities to rea- sonably predict and aggressively respond to both natural and human-associated disasters. The

Description

This course will provide students with a variety of cases that will educate students all the different phases of emergency preparedness and disaster management. It will analyze in-depth, how to prepare, mitigate, respond, and recover for dif- ferent emergencies and disasters. More im- portantly, students will learn about the different actors, agencies, organizations, and communi- ties, that must come together to make all seg- ments of society whole again.

 

 

course will engage in a comparative study of the more well-known national disaster response agencies in the disaster-prone regions of the world at the same time, will inquire into public administration best practices that have emerged.

 

 

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: PA 300 Co-requisite: None

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

Frequency

N/A

Frequency

Every Semester

Students Served

N/A

Students Served

PA Majors and Minors

Credits

3

Credits

N/C

Hours

3

Hours

N/C

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

N/C

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing In- tensive, WAC, etc.)

NA

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Intensive, WAC, etc.)

N/C

General Education Component

_x     Not Applicable

       Required

       English Composition

       Mathematics

       Science

 

       Flexible

       World Cultures

       US Experience in its Diversity

       Creative Expression

      Individual and Society

       Scientific World

General Education Component

N/C

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

 

Rationale: A course, PA 300, was recently re-named Public Bureaucracy and Disaster Management. Hence, PA 300 now serves as the foundation course for educating students about Disaster Management. Thus, PA 395, needs to function as an upper-level course in Disaster Manager. PA 395 is being revised to empower students to assess a variety of real-life emergencies from every perspective.

Students will evaluate a variety of case studies that provide clear, detailed, step-by-step explanations of major disasters or emergencies from around the globe. Topics include natural disasters, industrial accidents, epidemics, pandemics, and terrorist attacks. This course can be used to help prepare first responders, law enforcement, and government and nonprofit employees, for how to be proactive in this new world order.

 

Changes to Existing Courses in the Department of World Languages and Cultures AV.6

FROM:

TO:

Department(s)

World Languages and Cultures

Department(s)

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [ ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Academic Level

N/C

Subject Area

CHIN

Subject Area

N/C

Course Prefix & Number

CHIN 101

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Title

Beginning Chinese I

Course Title

N/C

Description

The course is an introduction to the study of the Chinese (Mandarin) language as a me- dium of communication. It will focus primari- ly on the acquisition of pronunciation and production of fundamental speaking, listen- ing, reading and writing skills. In this basic course, speaking is a priority and will be the foundation for students' further development of their practice in Chinese (Mandarin).

One-hour weekly attendance in the Lan- guage Laboratory is required. The course is not open to native speakers of Chinese or students with prior exposure or acquired proficiency in the language

Description

N/C

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: N/A

Co-requisites: CHIL 101-

Chinese Lab 101

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

Credits

3

Credits

N/C

Hours

3

Hours

N/C

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

N/C

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Inten- sive, WAC, etc.)

N/A

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Inten- sive, WAC, etc.)

N/C

 

General Education Component

_x     Not Applicable Required

English Composition Mathematics Science

 

Flexible

World Cultures

US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Individual and Society

General Education Component

College Option

Socio-Cultural, and Diversity Cluster Integrated Knowledge Cluster: Humanities and the Arts

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

 

 

AV.7

 

FROM:

TO:

Department(s)

World Languages and Cultures

Department(s)

N/C

Career

[x] Undergraduate [ ] Graduate

Career

N/C

Academic Level

[x] Regular [ ] Compensatory

[ ] Developmental [ ] Remedial

Academic Level

N/C

Subject Area

CHIN

Subject Area

N/C

Course Prefix & Number

CHIN 102

Course Prefix & Number

N/C

Course Title

Beginning Chinese II

Course Title

N/C

Description

The course is the continuation of the previ- ous semester of Chinese (Mandarin) as a medium of communication. It will focus pri- marily on the acquisition of pronunciation and production of fundamental speaking, listening, reading and writing skills. In this basic course, speaking is a priority and will be the foundation for students' further de- velopment of their practice in Chinese (Mandarin). One-hour weekly attendance in the Language Laboratory is required. The course is not open to native speakers of Chinese or to students with prior exposure or with general proficiency in the language.

Description

N/C

 

Pre/ Co Requisites

Pre-requisites: N/A Co-requisites:

CHIL 102- Chinese Lab 102

Pre/ Co Requisites

N/C

Credits

3

Credits

N/C

Hours

3

Hours

N/C

Liberal Arts

[x] Yes  [ ] No

Liberal Arts

N/C

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Inten- sive, WAC, etc.)

N/A

Course Attribute (e.g. Writing Inten- sive, WAC, etc.)

N/C

General Education Component

_x     Not Applicable Required

English Composition Mathematics Science

 

Flexible

World Cultures

US Experience in its Diversity Creative Expression Individual and Society

General Education Component*

College Option

Socio-Cultural, and Diversity Cluster Integrated Knowledge Cluster: Humanities and the Arts

Effective:

 

 

Fall 2020

 


Medgar Evers College Registered degree programs

http://www.nysed.gov/COMS/RP090/IRPS2A

Degree Name

Degree issued

HEGIS code

Delivery Format

School of Business

 

 

 

ACCOUNTING

BS

0502.00

Face-to Face

APPLIED MANAGEMENT

BPS

0506.00

Face-to Face

BUSINESS

BS

0501.00

Face-to Face

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION

AS

5004.00

Face-to Face

COMPUTER INFORMATION SYSTEMS

BS

0702.00

Face-to Face

COMPUTER APPLICATIONS 

AAS

5104.00

Face-to Face

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

AS

5508.00

Face-to Face

FINANCIAL ECONOMICS

BS

0517.00

Offered in both Face to face and Distance Education formats

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

BS

2102.00

Face-to Face

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

AS

5508.00

Face-to Face

School of Science, Health & Technology

 

 

 

BIOLOGY

BS

0401.00

Face-to Face

COMMUNITY HEALTH EDUCATION 

BS

1201.00

Face-to Face

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

BS

0701.00

Face-to Face

COMPUTER SCIENCE 

AS

5103.00

Face-to Face

ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE 

BS

0420.00

Face-to Face

MATHEMATICAL SCIENCES 

BS

1701.00

Face-to Face

NURSING

AAS

5208.00

Face-to Face

NURSING (RN'S

BS NURS

1203.10

Face-to Face

PRACTICAL NURSING

CERT

5209.20

Face-to Face

SCIENCE

AS

5649.00

Face-to Face

School of Liberal Arts

 

 

 

AFRICAN DIASPORA LITERATURE

AA

5615.00

Face-to Face

ENGLISH

AA

5649.00

Face-to Face

ENGLISH

BA

1501.00

Face-to Face

LIBERAL ARTS

AA

5649.00

Face-to Face

LIBERAL STUDIES

BA

4901.00

Face-to Face

MEDIA AND THE PERFORMING ARTS

 

 

 

PSYCHOLOGY

BA

2001.00

Face-to Face

RELIGIOUS STUDIES

BA

1510.00

Face-to Face

SOCIAL WORK 

BS

2104.00

Face-to Face

School of Education

 

 

 

CHILDHOOD EDUCATION

BA

0802.00

Face-to Face

SPECIAL EDUCATION AND EARLY CHILDHOOD Ed.

BA

0808.00

Face-to Face

TEACHER EDUCATION

AA

5503.00

Face-to Face

Note: All degree programs have offered online or hybrid courses.  Financial Economics, BS is the only fully online degree program.  Note that it is also offered in a standard face-to-face format.


 

ACADEMICS

UNIFORM CUNY GRADING POLICY AND PROCEDURES

 

 

 

 

Grade Glossary................................................................................................................................................ 1

Discontinued Grades & Grade Symbols............................................................................................................. 3

Grades Explanations........................................................................................................................................ 3

Guidance on WU/F/INC Grades........................................................................................................................ 6

Change of Grade Policy & Process Effective Fall 2021........................................................................................ 7

Academic Penalty Removal for WU grade Effective Fall 2021.............................................................................. 9

College Now Program Grading Policy Effective Fall 2021.................................................................................... 9

Final Grade Submission Deadlines Effective Fall 2017...................................................................................... 10

F-Repeat Policy.............................................................................................................................................. 10

 

Grade Glossary

The following glossary of uniform grading symbols shall be employed according to the interpretation provided below. Grades are assigned based on the definitions contained herein. Individual units of the University need not employ all symbols but must adhere to the following interpretation for those employed and may not use any symbol that is not included in the glossary. Quality points are to be used to calculate the grade point average (GPA) or index. A dash "--" indicates that the grade does not carry a numerical value and is not to be included in

the GPA. Plus ("+") and minus ("-") grades shall be interpreted as equivalent to "+0.3" and "-0.3", except as noted.

 

Grade

Explanation

Quality Points

A+

Exceptional

4.00

A

Excellent

4.00

A-

Excellent

3.70

AUD

Auditor, Listener

-

B+

Good

3.30

B

Good

3.00

B-

Good

2.70

C+

Satisfactory

2.30

C

Satisfactory

2.00

C-

Satisfactory

1.70

CR

Credit Earned

-

D+

Passing

1.30

D

Passing

1.00

D-

Passing

0.70

 

F

Failure/Unsuccessful Completion of Course

0.00

FIN

F from incomplete. To be used when the INC grade lapses to an F grade

0.00

H

Honor. Hunter College School of Social Work only

-

INC

Term's work incomplete (temporary grade)

-

NC

No credit granted

-

NRP

No Record of Progress. Exclusive to Dissertation Supervision at the Graduate Center Only

-

P

Pass

-

PEN

Grade pending (temporary grade)

-

R

Course must be repeated; minimum level of proficiency not attained. Restricted to noncredit, remedial, and to developmental courses

-

S

Satisfactory

-

SP

Satisfactory progress. Restricted to thesis and research courses requiring more than one semester for completion (temporary grade)

-

U

Unsatisfactory

0.00

W

Withdrew. Student participated in an academically related activity at least once

-

WA

Administrative Withdrawal. Non-punitive grade assigned to students who had registered

for classes at the beginning of the term but did not provide proof of immunization by compliance date. Student participated in an academically related activity at least once

-

WD

Withdrew Drop (Dropped after FA cert date during the program adjustment period. Student participated in an academically related activity at least once)

-

WN

Never participated in an academically related activity

-

WU

Withdrew Unofficially. Student participated at least once in an academically related activity

-

Y

Year or longer course of study must continue to completion (temporary grade)

-

 

 

CUNY School of Medicine Only

Grade

Explanation

C/

Passed the course/clerkship elements but failed the initial attempt of the NBME subject exam.

C/P

Passed the second attempt of the NBME subject exam; Passed the course/clerkship.

C/F

Failed the second attempt of the NBME subject exam; Failed the course/clerkship.

H

Outstanding performance in the subject area, far exceeding the clerkship requirements, limited to the top 10-20% of students.

HP

For performance significantly above expectations, up to the top 40% of students, but not qualifying for honors.

U/

Does not meet expectations in one or more competencies.

U/P

Did not meet expectations in competency and successfully remediated.

U/F

Did not meet expectations in competency and failed the remediation.

 

Discontinued Grades & Grade Symbols

Following symbols have been implemented as prefixes to grades in the student system to identify repeated courses including the application of the F grade repeat policy and Board approved variance, as well as to indicate a grade's impact on GPA and credit accumulation. CUNYfirst College have retired the use of these prefixes as they went live in CUNYfirst. Converted records will continue to display with the legacy prefix designation in CUNYfirst.

 

Prefix

Explanation

&

Repeated course which counts in the GPA but does not count in credits completed

*

Course does not count in the GPA and does not count in credits completed

#

Replacement grade, F grade policy, does not count in cumulative GPA

@

Repeat F grade policy, does not count in GPA, does count in credits completed

 

Following grades are no longer in use and have been removed from the legend of grade symbols. Colleges may not use any symbol which is no longer in use and therefore not included in the glossary. Values have been defined in this document for historical purposes of computation on existing transcripts.

 

Grade

Explanation

Quality Points

Effective Date

*

Current course registration/course in progress

-

04/1980

ABS

Absent from the final; make-up exam permitted.

-

09/2008

E

Excellent. (At LaGuardia Community College only)

4.00

09/1976

FAB

F from absent -used when the ABS grade reverts to an F grade.

0.00

09/2008

FPN

F from pending -used when the PEN grade reverts to an F grade.

0.00

09/2008

G

Good. (At LaGuardia Community College only)

3.00

09/1976

H

Honors. (Used only at Richmond College and only for students who began in Spring 1975 or earlier.)

4.00

09/1976

J

Failure for non-academic reasons.

0.00

09/1976

K

Condition course completed. (This is not a grade.)

-

09/1976

NF

Failure in a non-academic course. (At York College only)

0.00

09/1976

WF

Withdrew Failing. Student participated in an academically related activity at least once

0.00

01/2015

WP

Withdrew passing.

-

09/1976

X

Non-punitive failure

-

09/1976

Z

No grade submitted by the instructor - a temporary grade which

is assigned by the registrar pending receipt of the final grade from the instructor

-

05//2018

 

Grades Explanations

  • Any student transcript record sent from a unit of the University must include a grade for every course for which a student has been officially registered and not dropped during the program adjustment or refund period. The program adjustment period, formerly referred to as the add-and-drop period, coincides with the official refund and Census, Form-A due date.

 

  • Clerical, computer, or professional errors are not to be considered a part of the historical record and should be deleted.
  • Students who officially withdraw after the Financial Aid certification date during the program adjustment or refund period will have the administrative grade "WD" or "WN" recorded in the enrollment record of the dropped course.
  • All courses or credits for which the student is officially registered after the financial aid certification date or program adjustment period, whichever is earlier, shall be considered "attempted credits" for the purposes of financial aid.
  • A withdrawal after the financial aid certification date or program adjustment period will be assigned "WD" (Dropped) or "W" (Withdrew Officially) or "WU" (Withdrew Unofficial, participated at least once) or "WN" (Never Participated).
  • A grade of "WD" is assigned to students who officially drop a class after the financial aid certification date and prior to the census date.
  • A grade of "W" is assigned to students who officially drop a class after the refund period and prior to or on the last day to officially withdraw for the term/session. Students who have participated in an academically related activity and officially withdraw after the official refund period, but prior to the end of the designated withdrawal period will have a grade of "W" (Withdrew Officially) recorded. After that period, however, with special permission to withdraw by faculty and/or appropriate college committee, a grade of "W" may be recorded.
  • A grade of "WN" is to be assigned to students who never participated in an academically related activity and did not officially withdraw
  • A grade of "WU" is to be assigned (by instructor) to students who participated in an academically related activity at least once, completely stopped participating in any academically related activities, any time before the culminating academic experience of the course, i.e., final exam, final paper, etc.
  • The grade of "INC" lapses to an "FIN" grade no later than the last day of the following semester, or its equivalent in calendar time, exclusive of Summer Term/Session (see

updated Grade Change Policy Effective Fall 2021). The grade of "INC" (Incomplete) should be given by the instructor in consultation with the student with the following guidelines:

o only when there is a reasonable expectation that a student can successfully complete the requirements of the course no later than the last day of the following semester, or its equivalent in calendar time, exclusive of Summer Term/Session. It is a temporary grade awarded when the disposition of the final grade requires further evaluation for reasons other than the Procedures for Imposition of Sanctions related to the Board's Academic Integrity Policy o Transcript comments for INC grades should be added to the student record indicating the nature of the incomplete.

  • The "PEN" grade is a temporary grade awarded when the disposition of the final grade requires further evaluation and when the incomplete grades is inappropriate. 'PEN' is also used to facilitate the

implementation of the Procedures for Imposition of Sanctions whereby colleges must hold a student's grade in abeyance pending the outcome of the academic review process. Final determination of a grade will depend on final evaluation by the instructor or the outcome of the college's academic review process.

 

  • The grade of "P" or "NC" may be given as part of a 'Pass/No Pass/No Credit' agreement between a student and instructor.
    • To receive this grade, a student needs to continue participating in academically related activities, complete all assignments, and take the final exam. If a passing grade is earned (A+ through D-), the student will receive a grade of 'P' and credit for the course with no impact on GPA.
    • If a failing grade is earned (F), the student will receive a grade of NC/NP which does not affect the GPA.
    • This option must be requested prior to the last day a student can withdraw and receive a

grade of "W" via an agreement with the Office of the Registrar.

  • Students must remain in compliance with Federal and State Satisfactory Academic Progress guidelines.
  • Colleges may place additional restrictions on the use of this option which must be clearly stated in their bulletin and on their website
  • A college may choose to offer a First Year Freshman Forgiveness policy. o  If the student passes the course, they will receive the grade earned which will carry the designated GPA.
    • If the student fails the course, the grade will be administratively converted to NC and have no impact on the GPA.
    • This policy is limited to first year freshman as defined by the college.
  • The grades of "NC" and "R" may represent non-punitive failures indicating unsatisfactory completion of the course.
    • The "R" grade is restricted to noncredit remedial courses
    • The "NC" grade is restricted to regular, developmental, and compensatory courses. This grade can also be used by colleges for other administrative actions such as disciplinary dismissals. Neither of these grades is to be counted in the quality point index nor may be used in lieu of incomplete or withdrew grades.
  • The grade of "CR" can be used for the awarding of transfer credit.
  • The grade "Y" denotes that the semester's work has been completed; however, the course is still in progress and a final course evaluation cannot be determined until the entire activity has been concluded
  • To satisfying the program pursuit requirements for State financial assistance awards (Section 145-2.2 of the Regulations of the Commissioner), the grades of "W", "WA", "WD", "WN", and "WU" shall signify that the course has not been completed. All other grades, except for the "AUD" grade, shall signify that the course has been completed.
  • The grade point average is an index of a student's scholastic performance at a particular college. All grades that carry a numerical quality point value shall be included in the calculation of the grade point average.
  • Any notation regarding a student's probationary status appears only on the unofficial transcript.

 

Guidance on WU/F/INC Grades

Audit reviews by internal as well as both the State and the Federal government have required the need to emphasize the definition of following grades:

  • WU: A grade of "WU" is to be assigned to students who participated in an academically related activity at least once, completely stopped attending at any time before the culminating academic experience of the course, i.e., final exam, final paper, etc., and did not officially withdraw.
    • A WU grade should never be given in place of an 'F' grade.
    • The 'F' grade is an earned grade based on poor performance and the student not meeting the learning objectives/outcomes of the course throughout the entire academic term/session. If the student has participated in an academically related activity at least once or if there is documented evidence of the student's participation in a course, and they have ceased participating in the course, at the end of the term, the unofficial withdrawal grade reported must be a "WU". When a student does not officially withdraw from a course and fails to complete the course requirements, the instructor assigns the "WU" grade on the final grade roster.
  • F: A grade of "F" is a failure grade given to a student who completed the culminating academic experience of the course and failed. A student who completed a course unsuccessfully should be granted the grade of "F" with the culminating academic experience of the course, i.e., final exam, final paper, etc. This grade can also be assigned if the student has completed most of the course and documentation of failing course work is available. This documentation must be retained and available for review by auditors.
    • A WU grade should never be given in place of an 'F' grade.
    • The 'F' grade is an earned grade based on poor performance and the student not meeting the learning objectives/outcomes of the course throughout the entire academic term/session.
    • This grade can also be assigned if the student has completed most of the course and documentation of failing course work is available. This documentation must be retained and available for review by auditors. Moreover, such action should encompass the elimination of any possible "INC" grade being awarded, meaning that the "F" grade is awarded with full knowledge and effect that submission of any/all incomplete work by the student would not result in the student's passing of the course.
  • INC: The grade of "INC" (Incomplete) should only be given by the instructor in consultation with the student with the following guidelines:
    • When there is a reasonable expectation that a student can successfully complete the requirements of the course no later than the last day of the following semester, or its equivalent in calendar time, exclusive of Summer Session/Term. Upon timely completion of said incomplete work, the student would earn passing grade.
      • Temporary grade awarded when the disposition of the final grade requires further evaluation for reasons other than the Procedures for Imposition of

 

Sanctions related to the Board's Academic Integrity Policy Transcript comments for INC grades should be added to the student record indicating the nature of the incomplete

  • The grade of "INC" lapses to an "FIN" grade no later than the last day of the following semester, or its equivalent in calendar time, exclusive of Summer Session/Term.
  • Students who have officially withdrawn from a college and have these grades may be exempted from the limitations. • Academically related activities include, but are not limited to: o physically attending a class where there is an opportunity for direct interaction between the instructor and students.
  • submitting an academic assignment. o taking an exam, an interactive tutorial or computer-assisted instruction. o attending a study group that is assigned by the school.
  • participating in an online discussion about academic matters and
  • initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a question about the academic subject studied in the course.
  • engaging in an online academically related activity or initiating contact with a faculty member to ask a course-related question. Logging into an online class is not sufficient, by itself, to demonstrate academic participated by the student.

Change of Grade Policy & Process Effective Fall 2021

The purpose of this policy is to establish guidelines for change of grade and associated deadline and thereby facilitating timely progress to degree completion and compliance with financial aid requirements that all courses taken contribute to degree completion. This policy is intended to reflect the University's commitment to the student success goals and the requirements of New York State's Regulations of the Commissioner of Education.

 

Application for a change of grade, assigned by a member of the faculty, may be made at any time within one year from the end of the semester in which the course was taken. Either the student or the instructor may make this request. The procedures outlined below applies to the change of passing letter grades, PEN, F, FIN, WU. Grades cannot be changed once a student has graduated and their academic record is closed.

 

Change of Final Grade

  • Faculty members who initiate such a change must file a Change of Grade Form (paper or secure online form), including the reason for the change, follow campus changes of grade approval process, and forward the completed form to the Office of the Registrar, who will process the change and notify the student and faculty.
  • Undergraduate grade change request over one academic year requires the approval of the Grade Appeals Committee (or campus equivalent.)
  • Graduate change of grades over one academic year requires the approval of the Dean of Graduate Studies (or campus equivalent.)

 

Change of INC to Administrative FIN

  • Campus Registrar assigns the grade of FIN when an INC (Incomplete) remains unresolved at the end of the semester following the semester in which the course was taken (exclusive of Summer Term.)
  • The student or the instructor may appeal this administrative action. Graduate Students who receive an Incomplete (INC grade) must fulfill their academic obligation within one calendar year (or earlier campus deadline) of the end of the semester in which the grade of Incomplete is given.
  • Incompletes unresolved in the above-mentioned time-period will become FIN in students' records and may not be changed thereafter.

 

Change of PEN to Final Letter Grade

  • The "PEN" grade is a temporary grade awarded when the disposition of the final grade requires further evaluation and when the absent or incomplete grades are inappropriate. 'PEN' is also used to facilitate the implementation of the Procedures for Imposition of Sanctions whereby colleges must hold a student's grade in abeyance pending the outcome of the academic review process. Final determination of a grade will depend on final

evaluation by the instructor or the outcome of the college's academic review process. PEN grade must be resolved to letter grade by the end of the semester following the semester in which the course was taken.

 

Student Appeal

  • Students are strongly encouraged to first communicate with the professor of the course. If that conversation does not remedy the situation, or if students choose to not follow that route, then students who think that a final grade was issued erroneously may file a grade appeal. Appeals must be filed within 30 calendar days of grade assignment in CUNYfirst.

 

Faculty Appeal

  • An appeal instituted by a member of the faculty to change an administrative FIN must indicate that the work required to resolve the INC grade was in the instructor's possession prior to the INC deadline date. Appeals must be filed within 30 calendar days of FIN grade assignment in CUNYfirst.

 

Grade Appeals Process

  • Student or Faculty request shall be reviewed by the department grade appeals committee (or campus equivalent.) The departmental shall review the matter and make a recommendation to the faculty member within 30 calendar days.
  • If the departmental grade appeals fail to make a recommendation to the faculty member within 30 calendar days, the grade appeal will be escalated to the college-wide grade appeals committee (or campus equivalent.)
  • The college-wide grade appeals committee (or campus equivalent) shall have 30 calendar days to make a recommendation to the department and faculty member.

 

  • The faculty member, upon receipt of the department or college-wide committee's recommendation, must render a judgment within 15 calendar days and communicate in writing/via online form to the Campus Registrar his or her decision to either sustain the grade or submit a grade change.

 

This Policy shall supersede and override all undergraduate and graduate program-level grading change policies currently in effect at CUNY colleges and schools Effective Fall 2021.

 

 

Academic Penalty Removal for WU grade Effective Fall 2021

  • A withdrawal after the financial aid certification date or program adjustment period is assigned the grade of "WD" (Dropped) or "WN" (Never Participated), or "W" (Withdrew) or "WU" (Withdrew Unofficially).

 

Currently WD, W, WN are not academically punitive grade i.e., these grades do not impact student GPA. For Title IV purpose University uses our Grading policy (this document) for compliance with R2T4 regulations.

 

Effective Fall 2021, WU grade will not have punitive impact on student's GPA. WU grade will continue to be used to denote Unofficial Withdrawal. This Policy shall supersede and override all undergraduate and graduate program-level grading change policies currently in effect at CUNY colleges and schools.

 

College Now Program Grading Policy Effective Fall 2021

  • College Now is a University wide initiative to offer college level courses to NYC's public high school students. Students take credit-bearing courses that are part of the regular curriculum at any one of the participating CUNY colleges. Since these are actual college courses a transcript can be generated for all participating students who enroll in these courses.

 

  • Currently the same letter grade system that is used on CUNY campuses is used in these courses. Upon matriculation in any of CUNY colleges other than the one sponsoring the course, the course is treated like transfer credit. The earned letter grade is not entered on the transcript at the receiving school.
  • If the student matriculates at the same college that sponsored their College Now course, the course appears on the transcript as a regular course with a letter grade and GPA. Because the same rules that apply to students transferring within CUNY are used for College Now students, if a student gets a passing grade in the course, the course will transfer. If, however, the student attends the college that sponsored the course, the

letter grade and its corresponding GPA are calculated into the student's record. This is fine for students earning a "C" or better, but students earning a letter grade lower than a

 

"C" start their academic career when entering college, on probation. In some cases, their financial aid may be impacted.

 

  • Effective Fall 2021, in all College Now programs the only passing grades permitted will be iterations of A through C. Lower passing grades such as C-, D+, D and D- will automatically convert to the grade of CR (credit) and the F, WD, WU, W, WN grade will convert to NC (No Credit). CR will carry academic credit and NC will not. Neither grade will impact the student's GPA. Upon matriculation, NC grades earned during College Now program, will not impact students financial aid status. This Policy shall supersede and override all College Now program-level grading policies currently in effect at CUNY colleges and schools.

 

Final Grade Submission Deadlines Effective Fall 2017

  • Beginning Fall 2017, City University of New York (CUNY) will implement a university- wide Final Grade Submission Deadline policy. Given the variety of student-centered application, enrollment and graduation transactions that needs to be completed in a timely fashion, all CUNY institutions will require undergraduate final grades to be submitted no later than three business days (72 hours) after the last day of the final exam period for the term (or equivalent for sessions). Individual colleges may impose more stringent deadlines if they so choose. This date will be published in the Academic Calendar.

 

  • Submitting grades on time prevents delays students may experience related to Enrollment processes, Transcript requests, Scholarships/Honors awards, Degree verifications by employers, Conferral of degrees, Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Calculation, Academic Standing Calculation, and mailing of diplomas.

 

 

  • Given that the wide range of Graduate/Professional programs offered at the University have significantly less standardization in their instructional delivery models and practices, this policy allows campuses offering Graduate/Professional programs to use the 72 hours deadline or establish alternative grade submission deadlines for courses offered in these programs.     This Policy shall supersede and override all grading deadline policies currently in effect at CUNY colleges and schools.

 

 

F-Repeat Policy

04/23/1990, 12/14/1990, 9/19/1994, 2/23/2004

 

 

 

 

 

 

F-Repeat policy implementation for courses taken on ePermit

When CUNY Permit students withdraw completely from classes at both the host and home colleges if the PERM message course on the term record remains with no grade assigned the r2t4 process does not consistently recognize these students as completely withdrawn. CUNY Board of Trustees resolved that the grades earned for ePermit coursework shall appear on the student's academic transcript at the home college and be included in the calculation of the student's semester and overall grade point averages. This policy applies to all earned grades as well as to administrative designations. (BTM,2004,02-23,004,_A) Therefore all grades A - Z must be recorded on the home college transcript. Furthermore, when a student has withdrawn

 

from a host college course, either officially, unofficially, or administratively, the home college must record the W series grades assigned by the host college on the PERM message course in addition to the specific course equivalent recorded in other credits. W series grades include WD, WN, W, WU, WA.


Department of Nursing

Degree Programs

 

Associate in Applied Science (AAS) in Nursing

Medgar Evers College offers an Associate degree in Nursing which prepares the individual to enter the profession as a Registered Nurse. The Associate Degree Program provides the foundation for entry into undergraduate study for the achievement of a Bachelor of Science in Nursing.

Program Purposes:

  1. Prepare the entry-level technical nurse who will qualify to sit for the National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX-RN).
  2. Prepare the graduate who will be an accountable and responsible nursing care provider to clients with common well-defined health problems in structured health care settings.
  3. Provide opportunities which will encourage pursuit of lifelong learning and professional and personal development.

Expected Level of Achievement

  1. 75% of students will complete the AAS nursing program curriculum within 150% of program length once nursing major courses are started.
  2. 80% of graduates will pass the NCLEX-RN on the first attempt.
  3. 50% of AAS graduates will be employed as RNs within 12 month of licensure.

End-Of-Program Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Synthesize knowledge from the arts and sciences (biological, physical, behavioral), and information technology in the delivery of safe and effective nursing care to individuals, families and groups in a variety of structured health care settings.
  2. Deliver nursing care that is respectful of culture and diverse client groups.
  3. Utilize clinical reasoning and evidence based practice when making decisions on the health care needs of diverse client populations
  4. Apply effective communication principles and techniques in the provision of nursing care.
  5. Utilize moral, legal, and ethical principles to guide professional nursing practice and inter-professional collaboration.
  6. Employ the principles of teaching and learning in the implementation of client health education.
  7. Demonstrate accountability for nursing actions in accordance with the Standards for Practice for registered nurses.
  8. Participate in life-long learning, continued education, and professional development

Admission Criteria Requirements

All requirements for admission to Medgar Evers College must be met. For progression to the Clinical Nursing Phase of the AAS, students must meet additional requirements.. These requirements, include, but may not be limited to:

  1. Completion of Medgar Evers College/CUNY Skills Assessment Examinations (Reading, Writing, and Mathematics).
  2. Enrollment at Medgar Evers College a minimum of one semester.
  3. Maintain a "B-", or higher, in all science courses.
  4. Completion of College Core requirements.
  5. Minimum 2.7 cumulative Grade Point Average required.
  6. A criminal background check may be required.
  7. Completion of the application process for acceptance into the Clinical Nursing Phase.
  8. Repeat science courses which are 5 years or older upon application to enter clinical phase.
  9. Satisfactory score on the National League for Nursing Pre- Admission Examination-RN (Verbal Ability, Mathematics, Science and Composite Score).
  10. Required orientation prior to admission to the Nursing Clinical Phase.
  11. Any requirements as determined by the Department.

A.A.S. in Nursing PROGRAM FIXED/REQUIRED CORE - 12 CREDITS

COURSE NUMBER

COURSE TITLE

CREDITS

ENGL 112

College Composition I

3

ENGL 150

College Composition II

3

Mathematics and Quantitative Reasoning

MTH 136

Intro to Algebra and Trigonometry

3

Life and Physical Sciences

BIO/L 251

Human Anatomy & Physiology I

4

TOTAL

 

13

FLEXIBLE CORE

Scientific World

BIO/L 252

Human Anatomy & Physiology II

4

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS

BIO/L 261

Pathogenic Microbiology & Immunology for Health Professions

4

CHM/L 105

Chemistry for Health Professions

4

CIS 101

Computer Fundamentals

3

NUR/L/S 130

Foundations of Nursing Practice

6

NUR/L 131

Clients with Altered Psychosocial Functioning

5

NUR/L/S 272

Childbearing /Childrearing

6

NUR/L/S 274

Commonly Occurring Health Problems I

6

NUR/L/S 275

Commonly Occurring Health Problems II

8

NUR 276

Transition to Nursing Practice

2

PSYC 101

Introduction to Psychology

3

     

TOTAL

 

47

GRAND TOTAL

 

64

 

RETENTION AND PROGRESSION THROUGH THE ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE (AAS) IN NURSING CLINICAL NURSING SEQUENCE

All students must meet the following requirements for Retention and Progression through Nursing courses and must have:

  1. Current medical clearance to include occupational exposure health requirements.
  2. Current medical clearance to include New York State Department of Health requirements.
  3. Satisfactory health physical on file which includes Hepatitis B testing.
  4. Current Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Certification (CPR) from the American Heart Association.
  5. Physical clearance must state that student is physically able to perform all Clinical Course Requirements as mandated by the Department of Nursing and affiliating agencies.
  6. Minimum 2.7 cumulative Grade Point Average upon admission into nursing through graduation.
  7. Purchase of a MEC nursing student uniform upon admission into the first Nursing course.
  8. "B-" or higher in all Nursing (NUR) courses.
  9. Pass clinical, skills lab, and theory portions of each NUR course.
  10. Achieve a "B-" or better in all Science courses.
  11. Meet all requirements as outlined by the Department without exception.

Students who do not receive a satisfactory grade of "B-" or better in a Nursing course may repeat one (1) Nursing (NUR) course one (1) time only during their Progression through the Nursing Program. Students are expected to complete the Associate degree Nursing Program in no more than four (4) years.

Students repeating a Nursing course must earn a minimum grade of "B-" in the repeated Nursing course as well as a minimum GPA of 2.7 in order to continue progression through the Nursing Program. Achievement of less than a "B-" in a repeated Nursing course will result in the dismissal of the student from the Nursing Program.

Readmission to the AAS Nursing Program

Re-admission in a NUR course is based upon availability of space. Readmission is not automatic. Students who have not been in attendance for one (1) or more consecutive semesters, must apply for re-admission to the College in the Office of Admissions and meet all program requirements in effect at the time of re- admission. Students must apply for re-admission in writing, sixty (60) days prior to the date of requested re-admission. The written request is submitted to the Departmental Admission, Retention, and Progression Committee (ARPC) requesting continuation in the Clinical Nursing Phase. Only if space is available and all requirements are met that are in effect at that time, may the student be considered for re-entry into the Program.

Medgar Evers College will award the Associate in Applied Science degree in Nursing upon the student's completion of all sixty-four (64) required Nursing Program Credits. Graduates are then eligible to apply to sit for the NCLEX-RN.

The NCLEX-RN application requirements include:

  1. Completion of all AAS degree requirements for the College;
  2. Completion of all program requirements as outlined by the Nursing Department;
  3. Valid Student Social Security Number;
  4. Minimum age of eighteen;
  5. Good moral character and standards as defined by the New York State Education Department's Professional Licensure Board of Nursing.

 

BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN NURSING (RN-BS Completion Program).

The Department offers a baccalaureate completion program for registered nurses (RN-BS) designed specifically for the graduates of the associate degree and hospital diploma nursing programs. The program further aims to broaden knowledge and develop skills in nursing leadership and management. It also provides the foundation for graduate studies in advanced nursing practice as a clinical specialist or nurse practitioner as well as preparation for teaching, administration, and research in nursing.

Program Goals

  1. Prepare a beginning generalist professional nurse.
  2. Provide broad-based knowledge and skills in nursing leadership and management.
  3. Provide a foundation for graduate studies in advanced nursing practice and education.

End of Program Student Learning Outcomes

  1. Synthesize theoretical knowledge from the sciences, humanities, and nursing to enhance professional nursing practice.
  2. Provide nursing care that is respectful of the cultural, ethnic and spiritual diversity of the client populations.
  3. Communicate and collaborate with other health care providers and members of the community in promoting and maintaining the well-being of clients.
  4. Incorporate critical thinking and clinical nursing judgment skills in providing nursing care to diverse client populations.
  5. Demonstrate accountability for one's own nursing practice and professional development.
  6. Integrate principles of leadership in coordinating nursing care.
  7. Incorporate ethical, moral, and legal principles in your own nursing practice.
  8. Employ the use of technology and research in evidence-based nursing practice (EBP)

Admission Requirements

  • Licensed registered nurse with current RN registration in New York State;
  • Meet all Medgar Evers College admission requirements.

Nursing Department Requirements

  • Attend orientation to BS program during the first week of NUR 304 ( entry course in the program);
  • Review the BS Handbook and submit a signed BS contract acknowledging receipt of the handbook from a nursing faculty;
  • Submit proof of a satisfactory physical examination and immunization record annually (NURL 318 and NURL 421);
  • Submit basic life support (CPR) certification upon admission and at recertification;
  • Complete data card upon admission and submit to faculty;
  • Starting spring 2018 all supporting documents must be uploaded to CastleBranch.

B.S. in Nursing PROGRAM FIXED/REQUIRED CORE

COURSE NUMBER

COURSE TITLE

CREDITS

Completion of AAS in Nursing upon entrance

30 arts/sciences
30 nursing

Total

60

 

FLEXIBLE CORE

COURSE NUMBER

COURSE TITLE

CREDITS

World Cultures and Global Issues

   

ENGL 212

World Literature: The Evolving Canon

3

U.S. Experience in its Diversity

   

HIST 200

The Growth and the Development of the U. S.

3

Creative Expressions

   

ART 100

Or

MUS 100

Introduction to World Art

Or

Introduction to World Music

3

Individual and Society

   

SSC 101

Culture, Society, and Social Change

3

TOTAL

 

12

 

COLLEGE OPTION

COURSE NUMBER

COURSE TITLE

CREDITS

(Nursing degree program specific waiver)

ENGL 313

Writing for Science and Technology

3

PHIL 201

Introduction to Ethics & Social Philosophy

3

TOTAL

 

6

Students enrolled in this program have earned an associate degree in nursing. As a result, only 6 College Option credits are required. This program has a waiver to specify courses students must take in the College Option.

MAJOR REQUIREMENTS & ELECTIVES

COURSE NUMBER

COURSE TITLE

CREDITS

BIO 323

Pathophysiology

3

CIS 280

Computer Applications in Health care

3

MTH 209

Elementary Statistics

4

NUR 304

Perspectives on Professional Nursing: Past and Present Foundations of Nursing Practice

3

NUR/L 316

Health Assessment of the Adult Client

4

NUR/L 318

Community Health in Diverse Populations

5

NUR 321

Introduction to Nursing Research

4

NUR 322

Psychosocial Health in Groups

3

NUR/L 421

Nursing Leadership and Management

4

NUR 422

High-Risk Families across the Life Span

3

NUR 425

Professional Nursing and Trends in Health Care Delivery

3

SSC 305

Critical Issues in Society

3

TOTAL

 

42

GRAND TOTAL

 

120

Graduation

In addition to the sixty (60) credits earned in this program, the BS student must earn a total of 120 college credits to qualify for graduation. The graduate will be awarded a Bachelor of Science Degree.

 

 

CERTIFICATE IN PRACTICAL NURSING (CPN)

The Practical Nursing Certificate Program is eighteen (18) months in length. Medgar Evers College provides an opportunity to eligible applicants for entry into a Practical Nurse Program. The Practical Nurse Program of study is an upward mobility opportunity for selected applicants to achieve a Certificate in Nursing. Upon completion, the graduate of the PN Program is eligible to sit for the NCLEX-PN.

Program Purposes

  1. Provide a program of study designed for students who wish to qualify to sit for the National Council Licensure Examination for the Practical Nurse (NCLEX- PN).
  2. Prepare the graduate to practice under the direction of the Registered Nurse.
  3. Provide a basic foundation for upward mobility in Nursing.

 

Admission Requirements

Applicants to the Certificate in Practical Nurse Program at Medgar Evers College must:

  1. Hold a High School Diploma or a General Equivalency Diploma (GED).
  2. Complete all basic skills course work prior to admission into the Nursing major.
  3. Take and pass all three (3) areas of the CUNY Skills Assessment Examinations (Reading, Writing, and Mathematics) prior to entry into the CPN Program of study.
  4. Achieve a satisfactory score on the NLN Pre-entrance Examination.
  5. Provide current medical clearance to include New York State Department of Health requirements.
  6. Attend Mandatory Nursing orientation upon acceptance.
  7. Possess current CPR Certification from the American Heart Association.
  8. Have a satisfactory Physical Examination record on file which includes Hepatitis B testing.
  9. Purchase of MEC Nursing student uniform upon acceptance into the first Nursing course.
  10. Meet all requirements as outlined by the Department.

CERTIFICATE IN PRACTICAL NURSING (CPN) PROGRAM FIXED/REQUIRED CORE - 12 Credits

COURSE NUMBER

COURSE TITLE

CREDITS

ENGL 112

College Composition I

3

BIO 104

Human Body Structure and function

4

NUR 023

Introduction to Practical Nursing

2

NUR/C/L 024

PN Fundamentals of Nursing

5

NUR 025

Nutrition

3

NUR 026

PN Pharmacology & Calculations

3

NUR/C/L 027

PN Medical/ Surgical Nursing I

6

NUR/C/L 028

PN Maternal & Child Health & Psychological Nursing

5

NUR/C/L 029

PN Medical/ Surgical Nursing II: Specialties

7

NUR 030

PN State Board Review

1

GRAND TOTAL

 

39

RETENTION/PROGRESSION THROUGH THE CERTIFICATE IN PRACTICAL NURSING (CPN) PROGRAM
All students must meet the following requirements for retention and progression through the practical nursing courses: Achieve a "B-" or better in science course (s).

Students who fail to receive a satisfactory grade of "B-" or better in a nursing course will be given an opportunity to repeat a nursing course only once. A failure in any nursing course will result in the student not advancing to the next course. Sequential completion of all pre-requisite and required nursing courses with a grade of "B-" or better in each course is required. Students who do not maintain a "B-" or better (minimum 2.7 G.P.A.) will be required to withdraw from the Program.

Medgar Evers College will award a Certificate in Practical Nursing upon the student's successful completion of all thirty-nine (39) Practical Nursing Program credits. Graduates are then eligible to apply to sit for the National Council Licensure Examination-Practical Nurse (NCLEX-PN). Students are expected to complete the Program in no more than three (3) years.